sculpting for mold making, newbie question

Archived Thread
Our site is currently being changed over to the new version. Everything you see is currently in read-only mode. Additionally, the layout and UI will not be complete until all sections have been re-enabled, so please ignore any layout issues (or bland-ness) at this time.
#1 Respawning on 1 year ago

I want to try my hand at resin casting items for cosplay, and while I know on paper the steps involved I am unsure of a couple things. I was going to start small by making Ciri's cat pendant from the Witcher series:

[URL="https://img0.etsystatic.com/205/0/12058277/il_340x270.1304258848_esdq.jpg"]https://img0.etsystatic.com/205/0/12058277/il_340x270.1304258848_esdq.jpg[/URL]

What types of clay do you need? I know you need to sculpt the item itself (provided you don't have something you are copying already), but do you also need to have a different clay when making the mold? Or if you plan on doing the silicon mold route do you need a second type of clay at all? I think at this point I have just watched so many tutorials that I'm confusing myself.

#2 nathancarter on 1 year ago

I don't have any personal experience, but have you looked at Smooth-On's tutorial series? I'd probably follow their recommendations; they're growing to become an industry leader in this stuff.

[url]https://www.smooth-on.com/tutorials/[/url]

#3 Penlowe on 1 year ago

[QUOTE]at this point I have just watched so many tutorials that I'm confusing myself.[/QUOTE]
You aren't wrong, it's that there are a LOT of techniques out there.
And the hardest part is, we can't tell you which one will work best for you, you've got to experiment.
So this is the approach I advise:
- go back to the videos you liked best. Did they list specific brand names for all the corresponding parts? if yes, make notes of those brands. If no, ignore it, it's poorly delivered information.
- Once you have a few brand names, see how small a quantity of each you can buy. Acquire said small quantities and test.

While the item you picked as practice is nice, even it is a bit complex. I would do round shape with one incised wedge and one standing up wedge strictly for testing whether product A will successfully mold with product B. While the mold is setting up practice your modeling skills with more product A. If B fails, then you've got a ready to go A to test with product C.
Yes, it can be slow. If you are good at following cooking recipes this will be a comfortable process. If you don't go in the kitchen it may be very challenging.

#4 Respawning on 1 year ago

[QUOTE=Penlowe;5063570]You aren't wrong, it's that there are a LOT of techniques out there.
And the hardest part is, we can't tell you which one will work best for you, you've got to experiment.
So this is the approach I advise:
- go back to the videos you liked best. Did they list specific brand names for all the corresponding parts? if yes, make notes of those brands. If no, ignore it, it's poorly delivered information.
- Once you have a few brand names, see how small a quantity of each you can buy. Acquire said small quantities and test.

While the item you picked as practice is nice, even it is a bit complex. I would do round shape with one incised wedge and one standing up wedge strictly for testing whether product A will successfully mold with product B. While the mold is setting up practice your modeling skills with more product A. If B fails, then you've got a ready to go A to test with product C.
Yes, it can be slow. If you are good at following cooking recipes this will be a comfortable process. If you don't go in the kitchen it may be very challenging.[/QUOTE]

good advice, thank you (you always have good advice). I am pretty good in the kitchen so hopefully it will translate :)

#5 loz64 on 11 months ago

If you want to cast your mold in silicone, the key is to create your original from a clay that doesn't have sulfur in it. That includes modeling clay, paper clay, and Apoxie sculpt. Sculpey has sulfur in it so do not use it to create your original or the silicone will not cure properly!

Another option is to use glycerin as your mold material, which is much cheaper than silicone but works almost as good, plus it's reuseable. I believe with this method you can use Sculpey along with the other types of clay to create your original. Here's a tutorial/notes on how to create a glycerine mold: [url]http://www.observationsblog.com/sciencetechnologyexperiments/reusable-molding-material-homemade[/url]

#6 Respawning on 11 months ago

[QUOTE=loz64;5063702]If you want to cast your mold in silicone, the key is to create your original from a clay that doesn't have sulfur in it. That includes modeling clay, paper clay, and Apoxie sculpt. Sculpey has sulfur in it so do not use it to create your original or the silicone will not cure properly!

Another option is to use glycerin as your mold material, which is much cheaper than silicone but works almost as good, plus it's reuseable. I believe with this method you can use Sculpey along with the other types of clay to create your original. Here's a tutorial/notes on how to create a glycerine mold: [url]http://www.observationsblog.com/sciencetechnologyexperiments/reusable-molding-material-homemade[/url][/QUOTE]

thanks, I'll check that out! and good to know about the sculpey as that was the only clay I have kicking around. I hope my mom gives me giftcards for Christmas.