Simplicity Doing Armor Patterns?! Your Opinion!

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#1 KittyAngel on 9 months ago

So, I've been watching anime and I'm in the process of finishing up the anime Fairy Tail. As I'm finishing up the series, I've picked out some cosplays that I would like to do. 4 for Halloween costumes in general, and 2 for conventions for Cosplay Contests (the 2 are Erza Scarlet's Flame Empress Armor and her Lightning Empress Armor).

As I'm looking at the Simplicity Pattern official website, looking for the patterns to use, in the "Costumes" area, I saw this pattern here:

[URL="http://www.simplicity.com/simplicity-pattern-8630-misses-cosplay-armor/S8630.html"]http://www.simplicity.com/simplicity-pattern-8630-misses-cosplay-armor/S8630.html[/URL]

When I saw this, my jaw dropped:eek: The first thing I thought of is "Why are you doing armor? It has nothing to do with sewing and you're a sewing pattern company.

As I checked it out in terms of the envelope, the material requirements literally read "EVA foam". Now I know it doesn't seem all that shocking or surprising, but I think what's kind of throwing me off a little is the fact that a sewing company is attempting armor patterns that doesn't require any sewing whatsoever.

So imo, I've got mixed feelings about this. It's great that the cosplay costumes are getting a little easier since we don't have to constantly make our patterns from scratch over something that seems simple. On the other hand, for a person like me, it's like, "where's the challenge?"

My question to you guys, the cosplayers as a whole would be, what do you personally think about this since I found it on Simplicity's website? Is it totally awesome or is it too mainstream for you? What do you guys think?

#2 Elycium on 9 months ago

If it makes it easier for cosplayers just getting into armor, what's the harm. You might say "where's the challenge" but there's nothing stopping you from drafting your own armor patterns. Just like there's nothing stopping you from drafting your own clothing pattern from scratch, if you feel so inclined. Patterns exist to make shit easier for people to do.

This whole "oh no, now its mainstream, boo" mentality needs to go, imo. Anything and everything that helps make the process easier for someone who's new is a good thing.

#3 Chiagirl on 9 months ago

[QUOTE=Elycium;5065268]Anything and everything that helps make the process easier for someone who's new is a good thing.[/QUOTE]

THIS THIS THIS.

I've wanted to do a few armor cosplays like [url=https://hzweb.hi-rezgame.net/smite-web/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/BellonaKit_Tposes.jpg]Bellona[/url] from Smite, but being that I've never worked with the required materials before and there weren't exactly readily available "patterns" (I don't know what the armor term would be) for this sort of thing, I just kind of threw them out the window because, "I can't do it; it's too much armor and I have no idea what I'm doing." My Suzu cosplay I'm currently working on needs a tiny bit of "armor" for the brass knuckles on her gloves, and I'm already dreading getting to that part because it'll be the first "armor" type thing I've ever done. But this pattern looks really useful, and I'm probably actually going to buy it. Thanks for the link; do you happen to know if they have other similar patterns like this? The only other patterns I've seen that include armor are their Zelda and elvish looking ranger ones.

#4 gypsy_girl on 9 months ago

Simplicity is a pattern company. They do or did have other new sew craft patterns. For some people, like myself, it's a great place to start for creating armour.

#5 walkerofdarknes on 9 months ago

Well, my FIRST thought upon checking out the site was "Is there a men's version?" (Sadly, there isn't.)

Beyond that, as a guy just getting into armor, I'm still tempted to buy it just to have something to readily modify into what I need it to be. Which to my mindset, is part of the cosplay creation process. Very little of what I want to do can be bought "off the rack", so having a pattern like this that can be altered as need be to be correct can be a time- and stress-saver.

Beyond that, after doing a couple of sets, I couldn't imagine NOT having the pattern in my head at all times, so you'd have the ability to re-create it at will later on.

#6 lunaflora on 9 months ago

It's a good thing, as everyone else has mentioned already. About "going too mainstream," a company has to stay afloat somehow. With fast fashion, the cost of fabric and materials nowadays is extremely high compared to the price of a ready-to-wear piece that is identical to what you want to make. Less people are sewing out of necessity (Why would you, when it's cheaper and less of a hassle to buy it ready made?), and as a hobby it is expensive so not people can sustain it. Because of this, not many people buy the patterns for clothing anymore. So what do you do? Try to get into another market to get more customers to buy your products. Something that allows people to make things that are not readily available, and would actually be cheaper to make than to buy. What's that market that seems to be increasing each year? Cosplay. With the inclusion of Yaya Han, Firefly Path, and all the other very well known cosplayers and costumers, they have been tapping into a new market and drawing in new consumers. Costume-armor making is just the next step for them.

#7 ShinobiXikyu on 9 months ago

Huh. Definitely not something I was expecting to see (especially since foam isn't fabric, I dunno how this will work in a commercial pattern...). I'm not really an armourer, so I pretty much just shrug and say "Huh, neat" in response. :P (Also, Simplicity doesn't sell in Canada any more! >:()

#8 ShinobiXikyu on 9 months ago

[QUOTE=lunaflora;5065274]It's a good thing, as everyone else has mentioned already. About "going too mainstream," a company has to stay afloat somehow. With fast fashion, the cost of fabric and materials nowadays is extremely high compared to the price of a ready-to-wear piece that is identical to what you want to make. Less people are sewing out of necessity (Why would you, when it's cheaper and less of a hassle to buy it ready made?), and as a hobby it is expensive so not people can sustain it. Because of this, not many people buy the patterns for clothing anymore. So what do you do? Try to get into another market to get more customers to buy your products. Something that allows people to make things that are not readily available, and would actually be cheaper to make than to buy. What's that market that seems to be increasing each year? Cosplay. With the inclusion of Yaya Han, Firefly Path, and all the other very well known cosplayers and costumers, they have been tapping into a new market and drawing in new consumers. Costume-armor making is just the next step for them.[/QUOTE]

Can I get a THIS?

#9 CapsuleCorp on 9 months ago

I'm actually super surprised that they're offering boob armor of any kind, because any of us who have built corsets or bodices let alone armor know how difficult it is to fit yourself. I don't know how the actual company that designed the pattern created it, or how they've adjusted it to be "one size fits most people roughly in this size area," and might have to pick it up just to see how the pieces appear and how they fit. What I REALLY want is an actual beginner to use the pattern as directed and report on whether it actually works or if the instructions are leaving out a lot of important information - and whether it genuinely fits when your body type is size 12 bust, size 18 waist, size 14 hips.

Knowing what I know of how pattern companies work and how they draft their patterns, I'm super curious. But a few bad reviews will sink these kinds of patterns in a heartbeat. It's also SO generic, because it has to be! So everyone who has to heavily modify this pattern for a specific character might find the flaws in the pattern.

Upshot being, I'm all for things that help beginners learn but I'm also hella wary because I know how Simplicity actually works behind the scenes. I know how patterns go from an idea to an envelope in the drawer at Joann's. I don't know this person they've contracted to design the pattern and build the model, I've never heard of their work the way I've heard of Firefly Path and Arrivestri. So, my personal jury is out until I snap one up at the next 99 cent sale, cut out the pieces, and read the instructions.

#10 KittyAngel on 9 months ago

I didn't say it was going to stop me from making my patterns from scratch. I'm the type of person that likes challenges. Hey, I love the fact that I can grab a sailor school uniform pattern if I ever needed one. So, that's great! I can even get a Japanese priestess pattern for 1 of my 4 Halloween cosplays (at least for the pants portion). When you're a person that likes to be challenged and you see a basic armor pattern, you're going to get curious and ask the question 'why'.

So, when I see a pattern from a sewing pattern company that has a very obvious objective to make strictly sewing patterns that require sewing, then you suddenly see a no-sewing required pattern, especially from the material required to make said costume that's [U]not[/U] fabric, you're going to wonder where the sudden change came from.

Besides, you can easily find how to create armor tutorials on Youtube, Pinterest, etc. There's almost no need for a sewing pattern company to create an armor pattern, imo. Not to mention, not all armor are that basic, especially when you're doing a particular character. If you see a shoulder guard, shin guard, knee guard, or at least a gauntlet that would be a great base for your intended armor design, then THAT IS TOTALLY AWESOME THAT THERE'S AN ARMOR PATTERN!!!!!!!! I'm not objecting to the armor pattern as a whole, in fact, that's fantastic that there is one and it would help people to start taking up the armor making portion of cosplay.

I'm saying is when you've been doing this for 6 to 7 years (going on 8 years) and you're so used to [U]not[/U] seeing the Sailor scout uniform as a ready-made pattern, or at least anything steampunk and gothic lolita, and all of a sudden you see an armor pattern that has no fabric requirement as the materials, then yeah, from time to time, your going to start wondering eventually.

Anyway, I just wanted to see what other cosplayers thought about a sewing pattern company suddenly going no-sewing required pattern like armor with the material requirements being EVA foam.

#11 lunaflora on 9 months ago

[QUOTE=KittyAngel;5065286]
So, when I see a pattern from a sewing pattern company that has a very obvious objective to make strictly sewing patterns that require sewing, then you suddenly see a no-sewing required pattern, especially from the material required to make said costume that's [U]not[/U] fabric, you're going to wonder where the sudden change came from.

Besides, you can easily find how to create armor tutorials on Youtube, Pinterest, etc. There's almost no need for a sewing pattern company to create an armor pattern, imo. Not to mention, not all armor are that basic, especially when you're doing a particular character. If you see a shoulder guard, shin guard, knee guard, or at least a gauntlet that would be a great base for your intended armor design, then THAT IS TOTALLY AWESOME[/QUOTE]

It does seem a bit strange to have a "sewing pattern" that involves something where no sewing is involved, but again that's just the company trying to cater to their consumers and offering a new product that has never been available from them before. They've been having costume patterns, and armor is just another costume to add to the list. It just so happens that it needs no sewing. To be fair though. aren't "no-sew" products out there already? like fabric glue, and fusible tape (not sure if fusible interfacing counts, but it's worth mentioning), so it's not too much of a stretch in that regard.

You could also argue that foam is a type of fabric. No? then what is Pleather? or Vinyl? or Neoprene? None of these are woven, or knit. They're just... molded or poured/rolled on. They are flexible though. You can sew through them. You use them in garments/costumes/anything that you would use fabric in. Foam is the same. These days the definitions and classification of things start to get really blurred and wonky.

About being able to find tutorials on the internet, I will argue that you don't even need sewing patterns because there are online tutorials on that too. Better yet, there are online resources for basically everything. So why do people need to go to school? Or why do you need your Japanese priestess pattern when you could've drafted your own? Sewing patterns are there for convenience, and to give people a general idea of how to create something. Some people are able to jump into the deep end of creation and be able to understand what they are doing. For others, however, it may be a bit too challenging, where they need guidance, some sort of tangible visual instruction that is more hands-on than watching a video or reading about it, or being bombarded with "Connect A-C and D-Z, and square out 5 inches and do backflips over the table." Some people have never ever ever sewn before, or crafted before. Without the basic bodice or basic pant, skirt, dress patterns that are also available, how would beginners ever be able to create something? People have to start somewhere. Then they can built on/move on with their newfound knowledge/newly created armor piece to make bigger and better things.

#12 Angelx624 on 9 months ago

It does confuse me as to why a sewing pattern company would make a non-sewing pattern. But it's like others have said, they're trying really hard to cater to cosplayers, especially cosplayers with little to no experience with making cosplays. It's nice to see patterns at Joann's that are for specific cosplays(sailor scout uniform, Organization coat, etc.)

Perhaps they want to branch out and start making non-sewing patterns, and they just started with armor patterns. Who knows, maybe we'll see more like this. :)

#13 Syon on 9 months ago

Its weird and I don't have any use for it, but if someone feels more comfortable trying armor making, because of this pattern...why not?

#14 KittyAngel on 9 months ago

[QUOTE=lunaflora;5065287]It does seem a bit strange to have a "sewing pattern" that involves something where no sewing is involved, but again that's just the company trying to cater to their consumers and offering a new product that has never been available from them before. They've been having costume patterns, and armor is just another costume to add to the list. It just so happens that it needs no sewing. To be fair though. aren't "no-sew" products out there already? like fabric glue, and fusible tape (not sure if fusible interfacing counts, but it's worth mentioning), so it's not too much of a stretch in that regard.

You could also argue that foam is a type of fabric. No? then what is Pleather? or Vinyl? or Neoprene? None of these are woven, or knit. They're just... molded or poured/rolled on. They are flexible though. You can sew through them. You use them in garments/costumes/anything that you would use fabric in. Foam is the same. These days the definitions and classification of things start to get really blurred and wonky.

About being able to find tutorials on the internet, I will argue that you don't even need sewing patterns because there are online tutorials on that too. Better yet, there are online resources for basically everything. So why do people need to go to school? Or why do you need your Japanese priestess pattern when you could've drafted your own? Sewing patterns are there for convenience, and to give people a general idea of how to create something. Some people are able to jump into the deep end of creation and be able to understand what they are doing. For others, however, it may be a bit too challenging, where they need guidance, some sort of tangible visual instruction that is more hands-on than watching a video or reading about it, or being bombarded with "Connect A-C and D-Z, and square out 5 inches and do backflips over the table." Some people have never ever ever sewn before, or crafted before. Without the basic bodice or basic pant, skirt, dress patterns that are also available, how would beginners ever be able to create something? People have to start somewhere. Then they can built on/move on with their newfound knowledge/newly created armor piece to make bigger and better things.[/QUOTE]


Very good points my friend;) I didn't think about considering foam as a type of fabric. The reason being is because people use some sort of glue like contact cement to hold the pieces in place and not sewing thread. Besides, I had to use upholstery foam for my life size dog, Kogoro (for my Trainer Yuna from FFX-2 cosplay) and I actually tried a little bit of the sewing needle and thread. It sufficed underneath until I placed the felt fabric over it (before the furring). When I tried it, the needle sometimes would totally no adhere to the foam, which in that case would not work for any type of armor.

In terms of the fabric glue, fusible tape and such, those are also great valid points, but do keep in mind that a majority of the time fabric glues usually don't work (unless said otherwise through experience). Now I will say that if a particular brand of fabric glue is strong enough to do the job, then yeah, fabric glue does help in that matter.

So again, a part of me is glad that armor got introduced as a pattern. Just don't know why they started it now and not when they started the steampunk and gothic lolita patterns when they could have just as easily added it then?:confused:

#15 lunaflora on 9 months ago

[QUOTE=KittyAngel;5065292]Very good points my friend;) I didn't think about considering foam as a type of fabric. The reason being is because people use some sort of glue like contact cement to hold the pieces in place and not sewing thread. Besides, I had to use upholstery foam for my life size dog, Kogoro (for my Trainer Yuna from FFX-2 cosplay) and I actually tried a little bit of the sewing needle and thread. It sufficed underneath until I placed the felt fabric over it (before the furring). When I tried it, the needle sometimes would totally no adhere to the foam, which in that case would not work for any type of armor.

In terms of the fabric glue, fusible tape and such, those are also great valid points, but do keep in mind that a majority of the time fabric glues usually don't work (unless said otherwise through experience). Now I will say that if a particular brand of fabric glue is strong enough to do the job, then yeah, fabric glue does help in that matter.

So again, a part of me is glad that armor got introduced as a pattern. Just don't know why they started it now and not when they started the steampunk and gothic lolita patterns when they could have just as easily added it then?:confused:[/QUOTE]

Better late than never, I suppose, haha. Maybe they didn't see it as a good market to get into, or they couldn't find the right people to do the first sample until now. Actually maybe it's the whole female empowerment movement going on too. Finally being able to make a costume that is not a dress or bodysuit or cutesy.
Fabric glue is horrible. I don't really understand it, but it exists and people use it so it must work for them. I'm always paranoid with glue so I always end up doing additional hand stitches for more security. I try to only use it for small embellishments if I ever do.
II haven't worked with upholstery foam, but I have sewn through craft foam and it held up just fine. Not my favorite thing to work with though.