Needing assistance with giant dress ~

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#1 Rahzel on 1 year ago

#2 Penlowe on 1 year ago

[QUOTE]I would ask for assistance in the pattern as well but that's for later I guess;[/QUOTE]
NO!! [U]Pattern first,[/U] then buy fabric!! How will you know how much to buy? Buying fabric in separate batches can result in different dye lots or even not exactly the same fabric. You need your patterns on hand to know how much yardage you need. Or if you are guessing and buy too much, you can't return partially cut fabric (or any depending on where you bought) which is a waste of money.

In fabric selection: no you don't have to use only one type of fabric throughout a costume, I recommend using multiple types. Frankly that's what makes a lot of commercial costumes look cheap and mass produced is it's all the same weight & sheen.

In your title you mention a "giant dress" but neither dress pictured is what I'd call "giant". You also write assuming we all know who these characters are and why they would dress a certain way. This makes it frustrating to try to help because I haven't the foggiest idea who they are and am guessing the black (purple?) and white dress on the right in the picture is the one you are talking about.

You mentioned troublesome issues with previous costumes, but left out details as to what exactly went wrong or you weren't happy with. Again, we need more detail. We want to help, really, but you have to give us more information.

Go read my blog, it's linked in my signature. Scroll down to the second post, print out the worksheet and start planning your costume. Then come back with more questions.

#3 lunaflora on 1 year ago

Basically everything Penlowe has said.
A big skirt is achieve by either lots of petticoats, or a petticoat and a hoop skirt/crinoline cage.
About "doubting characters would buy the different types of fabric", to be honest I have no idea where or how you can make that assumption. I don't think they would even buy fabric at all. When transferring a design from 2D design to 3D garment, it's important to think about what looks good in real life. Some things may look good in the drawings, but there are limitations, such as different body proportion, impossible fabric textures, ways a garment moves in the animation/drawing that is impossible in real life because of physics.A large garment made up of entirely the same fabric and few colors might come out flat, boring, amateurish, cheap, etc etc. For garments, it's good to have different fabrics and textures for visual interest, and a place to rest the eyes. A dress that big all in a shiny satin looks cheap and overwhelming to the eye. It may work if the design was simple, but for something like this, with all the ruffles and poof, you may want to contrast the satin with a white matte fabric, like simple white cotton.

#4 Rahzel on 1 year ago

[QUOTE=Penlowe;5062193]NO!! [U]Pattern first,[/U] then buy fabric!! How will you know how much to buy? Buying fabric in separate batches can result in different dye lots or even not exactly the same fabric. You need your patterns on hand to know how much yardage you need. Or if you are guessing and buy too much, you can't return partially cut fabric (or any depending on where you bought) which is a waste of money.

In fabric selection: no you don't have to use only one type of fabric throughout a costume, I recommend using multiple types. Frankly that's what makes a lot of commercial costumes look cheap and mass produced is it's all the same weight & sheen.

In your title you mention a "giant dress" but neither dress pictured is what I'd call "giant". You also write assuming we all know who these characters are and why they would dress a certain way. This makes it frustrating to try to help because I haven't the foggiest idea who they are and am guessing the black (purple?) and white dress on the right in the picture is the one you are talking about.

You mentioned troublesome issues with previous costumes, but left out details as to what exactly went wrong or you weren't happy with. Again, we need more detail. We want to help, really, but you have to give us more information.

Go read my blog, it's linked in my signature. Scroll down to the second post, print out the worksheet and start planning your costume. Then come back with more questions.[/QUOTE]

I purchased fabric I thought was appropriate considering I had nobody to ask for suggestions and did something similar before for Rahzel, but of course I am now willing to buy other fabrics if I happen to get a better pattern. Patterns are not easily purchased where I am located so I wasn't really considering using one tbh - I don't wanna fight but cultural context is something obviously not too strong around (because, duh, conventions happen irl) so I'm gonna request patience ;
Context: that's two cosplays Lelouch and Suzaku (not females) use in a special episode, so I think it's not supposed to be canonically too elaborate. That's something I wanted opinions in aswell - should I go for canon or as elaborate as possible? I wanted to sew something as accurate as possible to the originals but lunaflora seems to disagree on it.
That's fanart. The giant dress:
[IMG]http://img1.ak.crunchyroll.com/i/spire1/05092008/1/4/0/b/140b8f528fcea0_full.jpg[/IMG]
I thought my explanation sufficed and was indeed assuming people could at least google whoever Lelouch and Suzaku are if not but regardless Suzaku is brown-haired and Lelouch is black-haired. I was going to repost in the appropriate anime section forum though but got no responses so I moved, sorry.
Not a lot of issues but I AM a self-taught amateur so of course not everything was perfect, ie. a canon seifuku skirt probably wouldn't display zippers. So I guess I wanted those kinds of assistance ie. how to improve my collars and skirts and fabrics etc. Sorry if I bugged you and thanks for helping regardless!

@lunaflora Yes, precisely my thoughts. I thought cotton might be a bit too heavy to get the puffy effect but that's helpful, thanks a lot!

#5 lunaflora on 1 year ago

[QUOTE=Rahzel;5062195]
Context: that's two cosplays Lelouch and Suzaku (not females) use in a special episode, so I think it's not supposed to be canonically too elaborate. That's something I wanted opinions in aswell - should I go for canon or as elaborate as possible? I wanted to sew something as accurate as possible to the originals but lunaflora seems to disagree on it.
That's fanart. The giant dress:
[IMG]http://img1.ak.crunchyroll.com/i/spire1/05092008/1/4/0/b/140b8f528fcea0_full.jpg[/IMG]

Not a lot of issues but I AM a self-taught amateur so of course not everything was perfect, ie. a canon seifuku skirt probably wouldn't display zippers. So I guess I wanted those kinds of assistance ie. how to improve my collars and skirts and fabrics etc. Sorry if I bugged you and thanks for helping regardless!

@lunaflora Yes, precisely my thoughts. I thought cotton might be a bit too heavy to get the puffy effect but that's helpful, thanks a lot![/QUOTE]

It's not that I disagree with an accurate representation of the original design. Most people want to make a costume exactly how it is on screen/on paper. The trouble is, getting to that accurate representation. You have to decide if your choices really are as accurate as possible, and that is all up to interpretation. Some people may choose satin, others velvet, leather, etc etc for the same exact costume. What I intended to do was to steer you away from is limiting yourself with only one fabric for the entire dress. My interpretation is that the purple fabric is a taffeta or satin, and the white is a cotton. Hence, I wanted to you to open up to the idea to use different fabric types.

For a skirt, you can always use an invisible zipper, or do a lapped zipper. chances are that is how actual school skirts are made. That way you can't see the zipper.

Cotton comes in different weights and weaves. Try looking into muslin, gauze, You could try broadcloth, shirting. Cotton is just a fiber, there are many fabric types to choose from. Just as polyester can be made into satin, velvet, chiffon, garbardine, canvas, etc etc. Try going to a fabric store and feel the fabrics and drape them, see how they hang. I understand that you may not have a fabric store nearby to do this. You could order swatches from an online store to experiment and see which fabric you find suitable for this.
The structure of the fabric does play a part in the volume of the ruffles, but it mostly depends on how much fabric is there. Try looking into circular ruffles.

I also want to say that we are here in order to help you, and we want to help you. Apologies if we sounded impatient or rude, but you have to understand that it sometimes gets frustrating when those who ask for help don't provide us enough information in order to do so.

For the white skirt, I think a simple tiered gathered rectangular skirt would be a good starting point, adding ruffles at the hem and the seam of the bottom ruffle. I would use a hoopskirt with a petticoat over it to achieve the volume you need.
For the purple skirt piece, You could make two square skirts (like a circle skirt but a square instead), sew ruffles at the hem and gather up the center of the sides of the square, and offset them.

#6 lunaflora on 1 year ago

Continuing off my last post, Have you heard of Burdastyle? I'm not sure taht is available in your country, but you might want to look into it. They have downloadable patterns that you print out and piece together youself. No need to worry about shipping and handling and all that.
I would look for a basic blouse pattern with a regular round/jewel neckline and full length sleeves. Make it more fitted, and from there you can modify it.
You could also just use a pattern you already have (if you have one).
I found a tutorial on making a puffed sleeve [URL="http://chimericfusionprotein.tumblr.com/post/98744778394/puff-sleeve-tutorial-for-cosplay-and-period"]http://chimericfusionprotein.tumblr.com/post/98744778394/puff-sleeve-tutorial-for-cosplay-and-period[/URL]
The only difference if that for you full sleeve pattern, determine where you want the puff part to end, cut across that line on the sleeve pattern add seam allowances on both top and bottom cut sides, and use the top part for the tutorial. Later just rejoin it to the bottom part of the sleeve. For the bell shape of the sleeve, again, determine where you want the flare to start, and cut the sleeve horizontally at that line. Take the bottom part of the sleeve, and just follow the same tutorial as the top part, but use the Slash and Spread method (Figure 1 on the image in that tutorial) Slashing from the bottom of the sleeve up. Don't forget t add seam allowances. You're going to have to make two of these for each side and vary the length of the two because they are layered in the actual costume.

For the collar, the quick and dirty way is to just gather a rectangle of the white fabric. Or you can use a semicircle. You're going to have to interface or starch the fabric beforehand in order to keep its shape.

Afterwards, you just sew the square skirts to the bodice at the waist, or make it a dropped waist if you want. I can't really tell with the arms covering the waist, but it seems like it should be at the waist.

After all this, all that's left is the cravat. For that I found this tutorial [URL="https://whatthecraft.com/victorian-jabot-tutorial/"]https://whatthecraft.com/victorian-jabot-tutorial/[/URL]

Just make the ruffles longer and the base bigger, the tie wider as well. After that, you're pretty much set.

#7 Rahzel on 1 year ago

[QUOTE=lunaflora;5062198]Continuing off my last post, Have you heard of Burdastyle? I'm not sure taht is available in your country, but you might want to look into it. They have downloadable patterns that you print out and piece together youself. No need to worry about shipping and handling and all that.
I would look for a basic blouse pattern with a regular round/jewel neckline and full length sleeves. Make it more fitted, and from there you can modify it.
You could also just use a pattern you already have (if you have one).
I found a tutorial on making a puffed sleeve [URL="http://chimericfusionprotein.tumblr.com/post/98744778394/puff-sleeve-tutorial-for-cosplay-and-period"]http://chimericfusionprotein.tumblr.com/post/98744778394/puff-sleeve-tutorial-for-cosplay-and-period[/URL]
The only difference if that for you full sleeve pattern, determine where you want the puff part to end, cut across that line on the sleeve pattern add seam allowances on both top and bottom cut sides, and use the top part for the tutorial. Later just rejoin it to the bottom part of the sleeve. For the bell shape of the sleeve, again, determine where you want the flare to start, and cut the sleeve horizontally at that line. Take the bottom part of the sleeve, and just follow the same tutorial as the top part, but use the Slash and Spread method (Figure 1 on the image in that tutorial) Slashing from the bottom of the sleeve up. Don't forget t add seam allowances. You're going to have to make two of these for each side and vary the length of the two because they are layered in the actual costume.

For the collar, the quick and dirty way is to just gather a rectangle of the white fabric. Or you can use a semicircle. You're going to have to interface or starch the fabric beforehand in order to keep its shape.

Afterwards, you just sew the square skirts to the bodice at the waist, or make it a dropped waist if you want. I can't really tell with the arms covering the waist, but it seems like it should be at the waist.

After all this, all that's left is the cravat. For that I found this tutorial [URL="https://whatthecraft.com/victorian-jabot-tutorial/"]https://whatthecraft.com/victorian-jabot-tutorial/[/URL]

Just make the ruffles longer and the base bigger, the tie wider as well. After that, you're pretty much set.[/QUOTE]

Replying to the former reply - I am aware and agree ... I was thinking of another fabric indeed so I'll try checking cotton fabrics. There are a few fabric stores around but their selection isn't big so I consider online shopping for the specific fabric.

The way I see it (in anime actually) seifuku skirts don't include zippers, but I wonder why since it'd be functional and beautiful. I'll search for circular ruffles ~ thank you
I was thinking of hoopskirt with a petticoat indeed but I'd never think of square skirts ;; I'll check it out so thanks a bunch really :)

Awesome! I had never heard of Burda Style but I'll definitely check it out since it's available. The puffy sleeves tutorial is super doable *^_^*

I've never really had to try interfacing or starching in a similar situation so do you think which would be better? The collar for Rahzel was identical and I literally taped it on my neckline because nothing worked. I'll try searching for solutions, thanks for hinting!

Thanks A LOT for every reference and I'll try to do the necessary reading and get working on it before I ask other questions. :) Plenty of thanks so far

Please don't sweat it out! I should say sorry if I sounded indelicate but the language and cultural barriers do come in the way of my hobby sometimes (sewing terminology isn't always obvious and basically sewing 'trends' sometimes differ) so I was probably annoyed because of other things and shouldn't be complaining about you personally! Thanks a lot really for all the help and I'm hoping to return later bearing great updates :wave:

#8 lunaflora on 1 year ago

[QUOTE=Rahzel;5062199]Awesome! I had never heard of Burda Style but I'll definitely check it out since it's available. The puffy sleeves tutorial is super doable *^_^*

I've never really had to try interfacing or starching in a similar situation so do you think which would be better? The collar for Rahzel was identical and I literally taped it on my neckline because nothing worked. I'll try searching for solutions, thanks for hinting!

Thanks A LOT for every reference and I'll try to do the necessary reading and get working on it before I ask other questions. :) Plenty of thanks so far[/QUOTE]
You could make the collar a part of the cravat too, that would probably simplify things alot.

I tend to avoid starch at all costs, mostly because I want things to be washable. You can try to interface with a stiff netting or other lightweight interfacing. Just enough to give the fabric the body it needs to stay upright on the body.

#9 Rahzel on 1 year ago

[QUOTE=lunaflora;5062200]You could make the collar a part of the cravat too, that would probably simplify things alot.

I tend to avoid starch at all costs, mostly because I want things to be washable. You can try to interface with a stiff netting or other lightweight interfacing. Just enough to give the fabric the body it needs to stay upright on the body.[/QUOTE]

I was considering it actually. It's how I was seeing it but it's actually a collar so I'll do the researc on interfacing possibilities. :) Again thanks a lot really!

#10 DlGlT on 1 year ago

I'd personally skirt burda as I don't find them particularly easy when it comes to their instructions (sometimes even knowledgeable sewers have issues!). However, the idea of print-at-home patterns does remind me that Simplicity also has this feature. (unfortunately butterick doesn't, cause they have my pick for patterns for this)

A bodice and C skirt from this pattern would be a good starting point
[url]http://www.simplicity.com/simplicity-pattern-3723-misses-costume-dresses/3723.html[/url]

You can find how to do sleeve poofs online, or get another pattern and combine it with this one.

This pattern has the skirt fullness, correct sleeves, and high neckline you need (view B without "belt"), but you would have to figure out the bustle draping
[url]http://www.simplicity.com/simplicity-pattern-4136-misses-costumes/4136.html[/url]

The bodice from this combined with another skirt
[url]http://www.simplicity.com/simplicity-pattern-1033-misses-day-of-the-dead-costumes/1033.html[/url]

Bustle pattern
[url]http://www.simplicity.com/simplicity-pattern-1819-misses-steampunk-costume/1819.html[/url]

Mccalls also has two that could work
[url]https://mccallpattern.mccall.com/m6420[/url]
[url]https://mccallpattern.mccall.com/m4948[/url]

For the "cravat" a nice matte satin would look good and should be stiff enough to give it some shape. It looks like a half or 3/4 circle allowed to drape around a middle point (the gem)

#11 lunaflora on 1 year ago

[QUOTE=DlGlT;5062202]I'd personally skirt burda as I don't find them particularly easy when it comes to their instructions (sometimes even knowledgeable sewers have issues!). However, the idea of print-at-home patterns does remind me that Simplicity also has this feature. (unfortunately butterick doesn't, cause they have my pick for patterns for this)

For the "cravat" a nice matte satin would look good and should be stiff enough to give it some shape. It looks like a half or 3/4 circle allowed to drape around a middle point (the gem)[/QUOTE]

First of all, Wow I never knew that Simplicity did that. That is amazing.

Secondly, there is no such thing as a matte satin. Satin is a shiny fabric. I think you might be thinking of crepe-back satin, where one side is satin and the other side is crepe, which is matte.

#12 DlGlT on 1 year ago

[QUOTE=lunaflora;5062203]
Secondly, there is no such thing as a matte satin. Satin is a shiny fabric. I think you might be thinking of crepe-back satin, where one side is satin and the other side is crepe, which is matte.[/QUOTE]

Simplicity owns/partnered with burda so i'm not surprised both companies do printables.

Secondly, there is such thing as matte satin (also called or similar to dutchess satin if I'm not mistaken, depending on company that sells it.). Its a dull sheen and is beautiful, while slightly heavier in weight/weave than say, normal satin or costuming weight satins. Its also smooth unlike crepe satin.

#13 lunaflora on 1 year ago

[QUOTE=DlGlT;5062204]Simplicity owns/partnered with burda so i'm not surprised both companies do printables.

Secondly, there is such thing as matte satin (also called or similar to dutchess satin if I'm not mistaken, depending on company that sells it.). Its a dull sheen and is beautiful, while slightly heavier in weight/weave than say, normal satin or costuming weight satins. Its also smooth unlike crepe satin.[/QUOTE]

Ohh, I see. I've never heard it called that. I'm used to hearing it as Peau de Soie. my mistake

#14 Penlowe on 1 year ago

I realize now there are same language/ culture hiccups here, sorry for mistaking your post as 'overzealous newbie' instead of 'struggling to communicate intermediate'.
[QUOTE]Patterns are not easily purchased where I am located so I wasn't really considering using one tbh [/QUOTE]
Ok to clarify this point:
No, there isn't ever going to be a commercial pattern to buy for exactly any specific anime character, and certainly not for a one episode outfit. By "patterns" I mean several different patterns and tutorials assembled that you can tweak and merge to get the outfit you really want. Maybe it's the bodice from a commercial pattern, a tutorial from a website for the skirt, and a collar off a thrift store shirt you intend to disassemble and use as a pattern. All of that adds up to a measurable 'pattern' to guide you in buying your fabric.

I hope that clears things up for you.
Digit and Lunaflora also really know their stuff just because they know different names for things doesn't mean either are wrong.

[Peau de Soie is the traditional name. Modern manufactures have adopted easier to pronounce/ remember names for their products like matte and duchess. It's the same thing, this just reflects a formal education in fabrics on your part Lunaflora ;) ]

#15 Rahzel on 1 year ago

[QUOTE=Penlowe;5062220]I realize now there are same language/ culture hiccups here, sorry for mistaking your post as 'overzealous newbie' instead of 'struggling to communicate intermediate'.

Ok to clarify this point:
No, there isn't ever going to be a commercial pattern to buy for exactly any specific anime character, and certainly not for a one episode outfit. By "patterns" I mean several different patterns and tutorials assembled that you can tweak and merge to get the outfit you really want. Maybe it's the bodice from a commercial pattern, a tutorial from a website for the skirt, and a collar off a thrift store shirt you intend to disassemble and use as a pattern. All of that adds up to a measurable 'pattern' to guide you in buying your fabric.

I hope that clears things up for you.
Digit and Lunaflora also really know their stuff just because they know different names for things doesn't mean either are wrong.

[Peau de Soie is the traditional name. Modern manufactures have adopted easier to pronounce/ remember names for their products like matte and duchess. It's the same thing, this just reflects a formal education in fabrics on your part Lunaflora ;) ][/QUOTE]

Sorry I didn't answer before :waaaah::waaaah:

Yes precisely and I really wanted to purchase a common Victorian dress pattern but I really couldn't ... I don't know if anyone sells these around because every pattern I got was either self-made precisely by thrifting clothes or purchased in secondhand magazine stores. I wanted something similar to [url]http://www.burdastyle.com/projects/victorian-dress-burda-7880[/url] (or those Digit posted before) and now I found it ;)
Although I am an amateur I've got a serging machine (was my mom's) I simply never saw use for it or any other "perfecting" facility because I don't sew anything other than cosplays for myself. So I am sorry if I seemed too uneducated. and hopefully I didn't offend. I really am thankful to you two and thanks Penlowe ^_^

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