Any Bad Experiences?

Archived Thread
Our site is currently being changed over to the new version. Everything you see is currently in read-only mode. Additionally, the layout and UI will not be complete until all sections have been re-enabled, so please ignore any layout issues (or bland-ness) at this time.
#1 KVN on 5 years ago

There's a thread on here for Cosplayers to complain about some of their experiences at conventions, but has any photographer here had any bad experiences? If so what were they? It doesn't have to be cosplay related, it could be at any convention or event.

#2 nathancarter on 5 years ago

I've never had anything really bad that I couldn't resolve. You occasionally get some people who aren't happy with their photos. I've never had this within the cosplay community, but a couple of times outside it. If you're a reasonable person you can usually work with them to make them happy - either with a reshoot or some more editing. Communication is key - try to figure out specifically what's wrong, and ask what you can do to fix it.

I've had a couple of flakes for my scheduled photo sessions at cosplay conventions, but these are minor annoyances, nothing more.

Flip side of the coin: I've bungled a few things that made other people unhappy. When I was still a rank novice, I formatted a card without having a proper backup in place, and lost an entire big-group photo shoot - won't make that mistake again, I assure you. Live and learn, and never repeat the same mistake more than once.

Twice, in two separate cities, I had a hobo disrupt a photo shoot on the street. That was pretty uncomfortable. I don't want to get stabbed in the kidney with a rusty hobo shiv.

Here's a thread worth reading:
[url]http://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthread.php?t=1367619[/url]

#3 fam-cosplayphotographer on 5 years ago

Flakes! Id say the flake ratio of booked appointments is pretty high especially for the free ones. If they are paying you and you can get it paid in advance or some small down payment then your issues will go down. Ive learned to get cell numbers of everyone on schedule and text them the night before as to not waste my time hanging out and waiting.


I did have a well liked cosplayer want shots and then when I found her and her group there she agreed to pose for a few shots. She had explained she had been pretty ill the night before...and when the photos came out she didnt like the way she looked (bags under eyes) and wasnt up to her standard. So I fixed the one on the group shot and she was happy with it and I took down the rest. To be fair she didnt look her best and the shots were ok but not super enough for me to cause any issue with so I just did the right thing and removed them.

Cosplayers are in general really great people, ive met a strange guy who called himself a "photographer" when we were all waiting for a cosplay contest...he sat beside me and was showing me creeper butt shots and wondered if i'd mastered the "no look shot" where he holds the camera over his head and pushes the button....and then when I told him I had no logical reason to ever do that he went on about how his uncle is a 30 year veteran in photo journalism and.....well.....lets just say all the photogs afterwards laughed, felt sorry for me having to be next to him but I was just happy I didnt get stabbed.

#4 Access on 5 years ago

Mostly, just getting into things that ended up being far more work than I expected.

Any scheduling or planning I do at a convention is very haphazard to begin with, it just seems like trying to keep to a hard schedule during a convention is setting oneself up for disappointment.

Bad experiences? I can't say I've had those. But if I look back over the last couple of years, the one thing I miss most is the people who have 'moved on' for whatever reason. I mean, among the ones who you enjoyed working with, or just hanging out with.

#5 Hcoregamer00 on 5 years ago

In every convention I have around 10-20% of the people who preschedule shoots flake out on me. Though much of it is understandable to a certain extent, like some would forget about the shoot or a previously scheduled shoot would run into my shooting time. So from Anime Los Angeles I have given up on having a formal structure for photoshoots. I don't charge for shoots anyways, so being tied down and waiting where both parties don't get paid (as in, I don't pay for shoots, and my cosplayer friends don't pay for shoots) is a waste of time.

Aside from the flakes that forced me to change how I do scheduled shoots, I really don't have bad experiences, cosplayer-wise. If you want to talk about photographers who jump into my shoot rudely, or creepers sniping on my shoots, I could go all day about my bad experiences. It is kinda sad that most of my negative experiences in my MANY years of doing cosplay photography was from other photographers :(

#6 skuggi on 5 years ago

Nothing outside the realm of normal event photography.

#7 Optical Prime on 4 years ago

[QUOTE=jonashley;4857558]
Cosplayers are in general really great people, ive met a strange guy who called himself a "photographer" when we were all waiting for a cosplay contest...he sat beside me and was showing me creeper butt shots and wondered if i'd mastered the "no look shot" where he holds the camera over his head and pushes the button....and then when I told him I had no logical reason to ever do that he went on about how his uncle is a 30 year veteran in photo journalism and.....well.....lets just say all the photogs afterwards laughed, felt sorry for me having to be next to him but I was just happy I didnt get stabbed.[/QUOTE]
Well, I've only been a news photographer or photojournalist for almost ten years and that guy is just a perv full of sh*t. We don't call it a "no look shot" I unfortunately have to do it all the time, I have had many shots like this published, but it's nothing I would call "mastered". Even while doing pole cam you get mixed results, but the pay off can be huge.

He sounds shady as hell.

#8 figment1986 on 4 years ago

I've had flakes, and then I've even had cosplayers get nasty with me "this was AFTER showing them the photo" to demand the photo be removed from my Facebook page. This was AFTER they took said photo, cropped out my watermark and made it their FB profile photo. After fixing said photo they still wanted it removed so I did to. I asked if they keep their profile photo as such up to please add a credit to me. They never did do such (and then I later found out talked trash to me to other photographers who are my friends and now that cosplayer has a bad rep)

other than that, nothing but positive experiences at cons.

#9 Hcoregamer00 on 4 years ago

This recent Wondercon Anaheim 2014 reinforced my previous statement about other photographers being the huge majority of my problems at cons. I did around 46 shoots, and (shock) when I was doing shoots with the more revealing cosplayers, there were many instances of photographers jumping in rudely and interrupting the shoot. In one instance, a 30 minute shoot ended up running over 2 hours because of all the rude photographers that kept on blocking shots and getting in the way, also requesting out of character poses so they could see more skin. So I had to repose them back to more natural poses on top of dealing with the rude photographers.

#10 Cosplay Media on 4 years ago

I've been doing this for 13 years now, (cosplay photography) and it really is some of the photographers I've had problems with, not the subjects. You will get your flakes on shoots, but that happens in every aspect of photographing people. You also receive requests to retake or remove photos and that's fine. At Comic-Con I was taking a photo of a Joker and Harley and in mid shot another photographer grabbed the Harley by the arm and told her that he needed shots. I can't stand it to see photographers touch the subject without their permission, (I understand asking a subject to touch them for posing purposes, if they cannot get into the correct pose) take photos of them without asking or taking photos of them while they are relaxing/ eating. They seem to think it's funny to get a pic of cosplayers chowing down on a hamburger, when in reality just let them freaking rest and get off their feet without taking photos of their every move.

In the masquerade photo area you really meet some INTERESTING folks. A few times one of them was taking inappropriate shots and the cosplayer realized this and asked him who he was shooting for, (what his website was) and his reply was, "Oh, I shoot these for my personal collection".

#11 fam-cosplayphotographer on 4 years ago

[QUOTE=Optical Prime;4858345]Well, I've only been a news photographer or photojournalist for almost ten years and that guy is just a perv full of sh*t. We don't call it a "no look shot" I unfortunately have to do it all the time, I have had many shots like this published, but it's nothing I would call "mastered". Even while doing pole cam you get mixed results, but the pay off can be huge.

He sounds shady as hell.[/QUOTE]

yes....it wasnt a stretch for me to assume he was a perv and filling his breakfast bowl with creepios ;-)

#12 figment1986 on 4 years ago

[QUOTE=Cosplay Media;4859668]In the masquerade photo area you really meet some INTERESTING folks. A few times one of them was taking inappropriate shots and the cosplayer realized this and asked him who he was shooting for, (what his website was) and his reply was, "Oh, I shoot these for my personal collection".[/QUOTE]

eww... i would have gotten security on his behind. thats so wrong and creepy.

#13 Hcoregamer00 on 4 years ago

[QUOTE=figment1986;4860532]eww... i would have gotten security on his behind. thats so wrong and creepy.[/QUOTE]

Yeah, the downside is that there is a very thin line in perception between an experienced photographer/professional paid photographer and a pervert with a camera. They can both have expensive cameras and huge lenses or cheap cameras and kit lenses. One bad experience spoils the bunch since the DSLR or large frame mirrorless doesn't choose its master, it is merely a tool that can do both wonderful art, and can also be a tool for perversion.

The most we can do as photographers is let our cosplayer friends know when there is a creeper with a camera and also notify con ops so that they can keep an eye on the pervert with camera.

#14 KVN on 4 years ago

[QUOTE=Hcoregamer00;4859336]This recent Wondercon Anaheim 2014 reinforced my previous statement about other photographers being the huge majority of my problems at cons. I did around 46 shoots, and (shock) when I was doing shoots with the more revealing cosplayers, there were many instances of photographers jumping in rudely and interrupting the shoot. In one instance, a 30 minute shoot ended up running over 2 hours because of all the rude photographers that kept on blocking shots and getting in the way, also requesting out of character poses so they could see more skin. So I had to repose them back to more natural poses on top of dealing with the rude photographers.[/QUOTE]

Being a newb I couldn't relate to what you and others were saying about other photographers, until just recently. At a recent convention, a photographer who had been shooting some cosplayer for some time had ended his session and started doing her boyfriend, and then when I started shooting her for several minutes he came back and interrupted our session so he can get them both together. His explanation was he was leaving for the day, although he never actually spoke to me, but rather the cosplayer. If you're going to do this take no more than half a minute at best to get a few quick shots and leave. Don't start a whole new photo shoot that lasts 5 minutes. I can't be waiting around trying to figure out when you're going to be done. The cosplayer should have not have allowed it in the first place. My etiquette wasn't the best at my first and second convention, but I never interrupted another photographer like this.

I also experienced my first flake, but if this is the extent of anyone's bad experiences then you have not experienced anything bad.

#15 Hcoregamer00 on 4 years ago

Flakes are not bad, there are a myriad of things that can prevent a cosplayer from meeting at the designated time and area. A previous shoot could be running long, the food line or food service could be too long, they could be cosplaying as an incredibly popular series and they were stopped frequently, the bus running to the hotel could be running late. As photographers we have to consider that this is not only a possibility, but that it will happen when sticking with a rigid schedule.

Only when a pattern emerges of someone who does it multiple times does the onus move from the cosplayer's bad luck to a serious case of not taking your work seriously. Until that pattern emerges, a photographer should be understadable about "flaky" cosplayers. Also, sticking to a rigid schedule and overbooking leads to a lack of flexibility, so a more flexible schedule and not sticking to a rigid schedule helps.

I don't plan shoots before cons anymore, and my work has improved immensely because a shoot can be as long or as short as necessary. It also doesn't tie to you a schedule where you MUST be at a certain plane at a certain time.

Follow Cosplay.com