Suggestions on Lens

Archived Thread
Our site is currently being changed over to the new version. Everything you see is currently in read-only mode. Additionally, the layout and UI will not be complete until all sections have been re-enabled, so please ignore any layout issues (or bland-ness) at this time.
#1 Vergil117 on 4 years ago

Hello everyone I just got a Nikon D3300, currently I just have the stock lens that came with the camera. I'm looking to get a prime lens I'm looking at the 35mm f/1.8. But I keep hearing the 50mm f/1.8 is better in some regards. I'm not really that worried about light cause here in Hawaii we have really just one con per year and the place it is located has a lot of light for hallway shots (A LOT of skylights in the convention center here). The vender area of course has fluorescent lighting and the panel areas are as always dim light. I want a lens that can great shots and do great DoF.

#2 brucer007 on 4 years ago

It depends on how you like to photograph people, and how much space you have to do it in. Compared to a more tele-photo lens like a 50mm, or more, a 35mm lens will be easier to see the whole person, if you are limited in space, but it shows more wider background too, so it will be more challenging to omit parts of the location you don't want. A 50mm lens will show less background, and is better for shots from the knees, or waist up. I like using an 85mm 1.8 for closer shots, or the whole body, if there is enough room.

Regard "great DoF", I assume you mean, shallow depth-of-field, or blurry backgrounds. Any of these fast f-stop lenses will optimize blurry background, but the farther you are from them, the more clear your background, and foreground will be. You will have to combine all the physics of what produces shallow depth-of-field.

If you don't mind carrying a bit more equipment, get, and bring 2 or three lenses.

#3 fam-cosplayphotographer on 4 years ago

Vergil you'll want the 35 1.8 DX [url]http://www.amazon.com/Nikon-35mm-1-8G-Digital-Cameras/dp/B001S2PPT0/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1421782043&sr=8-1&keywords=35+1.8+dx[/url]

The 35mm on the d3300 is the 50mm equiv on a full frame. Plus the cheaper 50mm 1.8's wont work on your camera if you expect it to autofocus (the higher end nikon bodies have built in focus motors but the d3300 relies on the motors in the lenses). Look for the AF-S on the name of the lens to make sure itll work with autofocus on your camera.

Brucer007 is right the 50mm will be more telephoto, if you have a crop sensor the 35 1.8 should be #1 on your list.

#4 nathancarter on 4 years ago

Look at the photos you're taking with the kit lens, look in the EXIF/metadata at the focal lengths, figure out what focal lengths you usually use with the kit zoom lens. That will give you some insight as to what other lenses you might like.

If you're using Lightroom, in the Library module in Grid mode, you can turn on a filter to let you sort and filter by focal length (as well as a zillion other things).

Personally, I almost always go for a longer focal length.


Opinion: Don't worry too much about the "crop conversion" multiplier. That's only really relevant if all the following apply:
- You've been shooting for a very long time with cameras of a particular sensor/film size
- From that experience, you know exactly what field of view you'll get from a given focal length
- Now you're moving to a camera of a different sensor size
- You like to do lots of math in your head instead of just putting the lens on the camera and looking through the viewfinder

#5 WonJohnSoup on 4 years ago

I'm personally not a fan of the 50mm "normal" field of view look (on a full frame, so I guess on your crop camera a 35mm would give you roughly the 50mm look). I prefer staying in the 28mm-35mm and 85mm-135mm range for most of my shots.

One thing that might help you decide is to use your kit lens the way I use the zoom lens on my Panasonic LX100, which has a "step zoom" option, meaning I can ONLY use the common prime focal lengths of 24mm, 28mm, 35mm, 50mm, 70mm, 75mm, 90mm, 135mm, 150mm and 200mm. On your kit lens, try zooming to a pre-determined focal length and THEN composing. Understanding the perspective changes the focal lengths force you to contend with makes you to pre-visualize the effect you want more. Then see which length you like best.

This is actually why I prefer prime lenses for my motion picture work over zooms. They say zooms can "make you creatively lazy," and I found this to be true in my case. Forcing myself to use predetermined lengths has really helped me get more controlled shots.

Worst comes to worst, you can use a wider lengths and just crop in in post-production. Cameras nowadays have so many megapixels you can effectively quadruple your focal length or more if you're only posting to the internet and not printing.

#6 PanS on 4 years ago

[QUOTE=jonashley;4943944]Vergil you'll want the 35 1.8 DX [url]http://www.amazon.com/Nikon-35mm-1-8G-Digital-Cameras/dp/B001S2PPT0/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1421782043&sr=8-1&keywords=35+1.8+dx[/url]

The 35mm on the d3300 is the 50mm equiv on a full frame. Plus the cheaper 50mm 1.8's wont work on your camera if you expect it to autofocus (the higher end nikon bodies have built in focus motors but the d3300 relies on the motors in the lenses). Look for the AF-S on the name of the lens to make sure itll work with autofocus on your camera.

Brucer007 is right the 50mm will be more telephoto, if you have a crop sensor the 35 1.8 should be #1 on your list.[/QUOTE]

+1 this. 35mm f1.8 was my lens of choice for years. It wont do you wrong and can be used for most anything.

Follow Cosplay.com
CosTools