All Inclusive Fabric Painting Thread

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#1 tifaia on 7 years ago

#2 tifaia on 7 years ago

#3 SaiTheKid on 7 years ago

I love you. 8)

#4 CapsuleCorp on 7 years ago

A small addition: several brands make a Textile Medium that can be added to acrylic paints to essentially turn them into fabric paint - I'm not sure if it's GAC 9000 in every forumulation or something else that just gets labeled "textile medium," but it exists and can be used. I've never personally used it because Jacquard so far has met every single one of my needs, but I can see how if someone wanted to quickly paint something a very specific color, and that color only comes in acrylic paint/they don't have the knowledge or time to mix colors, they could use textile medium with their paint.

I will always extoll the wonders of Jacquard's brand, their black is real black, their NeoOpaque white can be painted easily onto black t-shirts, and their paints can be watered down and blended like watercolors for neat effects. It really is a shame that Joann's is phasing them out, I don't want to have to start ordering online.

#5 tifaia on 7 years ago

[QUOTE=CapsuleCorp;3889722]A small addition: several brands make a Textile Medium that can be added to acrylic paints to essentially turn them into fabric paint - I'm not sure if it's GAC 9000 in every forumulation or something else that just gets labeled "textile medium," but it exists and can be used. I've never personally used it because Jacquard so far has met every single one of my needs, but I can see how if someone wanted to quickly paint something a very specific color, and that color only comes in acrylic paint/they don't have the knowledge or time to mix colors, they could use textile medium with their paint.

I will always extoll the wonders of Jacquard's brand, their black is real black, their NeoOpaque white can be painted easily onto black t-shirts, and their paints can be watered down and blended like watercolors for neat effects. It really is a shame that Joann's is phasing them out, I don't want to have to start ordering online.[/QUOTE]

Thanks for the addition. The only one that I have any luck finding locally has been the GAC, but if people are willing to do the search online, I'm sure they'll have no problem finding other textile mediums that can be added to acrylics.

And glad that others are on the Jacquard bandwagon. I've been stocking up knowing that Joann's is going to be letting them go. :(

#6 SaiTheKid on 7 years ago

I have a problem.
-I used fabric spray paint on my pants, and it feels kind of rough.
Is it suppose to feel like this?
-Can I spray another layer of paint over the first layer?

#7 tifaia on 7 years ago

[QUOTE=SaiTheKid;3890194]I have a problem.
-I used fabric spray paint on my pants, and it feels kind of rough.
Is it suppose to feel like this?
-Can I spray another layer of paint over the first layer?[/QUOTE]

What paint did you use and what material are the pants? Are they textured (like jeans) or solid fabric? How far away did you spray the paint from the material?

#8 RaDragon76 on 7 years ago

[QUOTE=CapsuleCorp;3889722]It really is a shame that Joann's is phasing them out, I don't want to have to start ordering online.[/QUOTE]

I'm not happy to hear that. Guess I should think about stocking up on some myself then. I don't do a lot of fabric painting but I chose Jacquard's over most anything else when I do and it's been totally worth the price.

As for textile medium it works pretty well though it doesn't work so well with the glossy paints. A lot of the fabric painting on my Earth Queen costume was done with acrylics plus textile medium because I couldn't find the exact colors I wanted in any fabric paint and mixing paints wasn't really working out at the time.

#9 SaiTheKid on 7 years ago

[QUOTE=tifaia;3890457]What paint did you use and what material are the pants? Are they textured (like jeans) or solid fabric? How far away did you spray the paint from the material?[/QUOTE]
My friend has the paint right now.
The pants is like 70% cotton (or 60%) and 30% (or 40 %) polyester.
Sorry I forgot. Its a karate gi pants.

#10 tifaia on 7 years ago

@SaiTheKid: Sounds like it could be a few things. The paint may have gone bad (even if it's brand new, it can happen), the pants weren't washed before painting, paint didn't fully dry and/or requires additional coats.

Because of the fabric content, I have a silly suggestion. Repaint the pants at least 1-2 more coats. After it's fully dried, use a vacuum with brush attachment (preferably a hand-held, small vacuum if available) and go over the pants to smooth them out. The vacuum will remove flakes and help the pants feel smoother. It can also fade the color a bit, which is why I suggest additional layers of paint. Test this out on a small area first to ensure that it works before doing the entire piece.

Removing it and trying again is another option, but that can be tricky depending upon what paint was used. Simply Spray can be removed with an immense amount of washing and fabric softener, but it's very time consuming.

#11 RaeSeddon on 7 years ago

So, I need to paint pleather, and I was wondering what the best brand was for that, that wouldn't break/crack once dry? I've been doing my own research, but the fact of the matter is I just don't have enough experience with fabric paints to make an informed decision. Any suggestions?

#12 tifaia on 7 years ago

@RaeSeddon: Jacquard all the way. If you want a more embossed look, Scribbles or Puffy can work, but make sure you keep the paint thin and not clump during use. I've found that too much Puffy Paint on pleather can chip, but as long as it's a low amount, it stays on just fine.

#13 RaeSeddon on 7 years ago

[QUOTE=tifaia;3893305]@RaeSeddon: Jacquard all the way. If you want a more embossed look, Scribbles or Puffy can work, but make sure you keep the paint thin and not clump during use. I've found that too much Puffy Paint on pleather can chip, but as long as it's a low amount, it stays on just fine.[/QUOTE]

Thanks so much! That looked to be the best bet while I was doing my research, but having never used it I wasn't sure. What would you recommend as far as brush type?

#14 Syagria on 7 years ago

FWIW, I've used fabric spray paint on a fairly fine polyester gauze material with no problems. The gauze was a gradation of brown to blue to yellow, and had a number of small star-like silver dots on it, and I wanted the gradation to be black to blue to yellow to red.

I laid out the material outside on a layer of newspaper, and, to prevent overspray, covered the brown/blue areas with additional newspaper. I spray painted red fabric spray paint along the bottom yellow edge, working upwards in even passes until I had achieved a gradation of the spray paint red to the native yellow of the material, with a nice blend of orange in between. Once it dried, I used the same technique to cover all of the brown with black fabric spray paint and blended it evenly into the blue.

It came out perfectly: a gradation that looks just like a sunset, and the paint did not adhere to the small silver speckles. Although the paint does cause a minor amount of stiffness in the material, it is still as translucent and gauzy as the original. It doesn't flake off or stain other fabrics. I used the gauze to make a set of fairy wings, and they came out great. One of these days, I'll have photos of it...

#15 RaeSeddon on 7 years ago

I'll keep that in mind as well. I already ordered some Jacquard in the color I need, but if that doesn't work, I'll keep the spray paint on the side. My concern is that the pleather is kinda thick, so I doubt the paint will really absorb into the fabric as sit on top.