How to make one's own patterens

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#1 TheDragonPrince on 6 years ago

Alot of my cosplaying friends use their own patterens to make cosplay. I want to make own cosplay because I can cosplay more thing besides suits and Homestuck. Could some one post a tourial or a link to one about making own patterns?

#2 Libis on 6 years ago

First off, do you know how to sew? If not, start out with commercially available patterns at least. I started out making square pillows long before I even did those.

You might check and see if your local fabric store or community college has classes on pattern drafting.

[url]http://tuttofattoamano.blogspot.com/2009/06/pattern-drafting-101.html[/url]

[url]http://www.burdastyle.com/blog/pattern-drafting[/url]

[url]http://www.renaissancetailor.com/demos_patterndraft.htm[/url]

[url]http://www.patterndraftingforfitandfashion.com/[/url]

#3 Libis on 6 years ago

By the way, for commercially available patterns, I like these sites:

[url]http://voguepatterns.mccall.com/[/url]

[url]http://kwiksew.mccall.com/[/url]

[url]http://butterick.mccall.com/[/url]

[url]http://mccallpattern.mccall.com/[/url]

[url]http://www.simplicity.com/[/url]

#4 Evil Bishounen on 6 years ago

If you go the classes route to learn about making your own custom garments (which you totally should if you really want to do more as a cosplayer), I recommend taking sewing classes first, and then get into patternmaking. If you go into pattern drafting with that foundation of sewing knowledge, you'll have a better understanding of what you need to do to really complete a workable pattern.

While you could do patternmaking first before sewing classes, the people I've seen go that route tend to struggle a lot more, make more mistakes, and don't really have as much grasp of the finishing additions needed for when the garment will actually be sewn.

#5 Nostrum on 6 years ago

I agree. I learnt to sew before I learnt to draft patterns.

There are books all over the place, but it's also worth trying to find a website that has step-by-step tutorials on drafting patterns. If you've never worked with them before you really do need someone with you who knows what's going on.

#6 bunny_Bri on 6 years ago

I am going to complete agree. Pattern drafting seem to come more naturally to those who already have a strong concept of what is needed in order to complete a pattern. If and when you learn to do some basic sewing and have completed some clothing patterns I highly recommend the following book:

Patternmaking for Fashion Design
[url]http://www.amazon.com/Patternmaking-Fashion-Design-5th-Edition/dp/0136069347/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&qid=1354215070&sr=8-7&keywords=pattern+drafting[/url]

It's a text book used in a couple different fashion schools, including my own, FIDM. It's one of the most comprehensive pattern making books that I own, and I own many. The best part is you can literally teach yourself almost everything from this book. Many of the concepts will be done in women's clothing but, there is a section on men, and trust me if you can contour things to fit all the curvatures of a woman's body - honey, you can make anything.

You will learn to make your own slopers which are INVALUABLE! I own a complete set for myself beyond just the basic 3.

I am happy to share anything else you might want to know about pattern drafting whenever you are ready to learn. :)

#7 Evil Bishounen on 6 years ago

[QUOTE=bunny_Bri;4559250]Patternmaking for Fashion Design

It's a text book used in a couple different fashion schools, including my own, FIDM.[/quote]

Do you have the 5th edition? How is menswear covered in it? Is it only one chapter? (Is that chapter short or substantial?) Is men's fitting and measurements discussed throughout the book or just in that one chapter?

I have the 3rd edition of this textbook, which was current way back when I took patternmaking in community college. Unfortunately, it had absolutely no mention of men's patterning and tailoring. It was all women's patterns except for a supposedly "unisex" section on pants which wasn't really unisex at all. (I tried drafting from it and just...no.) So while the pattern manipulation concepts in it are really good, it's usefulness for me personally was very limited in terms of slopers and fitting. I rarely use it unless I'm making something very weird.

I heard from a friend about the updates to the 5th edition, so I'm contemplating getting it. I'm digging for reviews and more info before I dish out the money though, since it's sold at textbook prices.

#8 bunny_Bri on 6 years ago

[QUOTE=Evil Bishounen;4559664]Do you have the 5th edition? How is menswear covered in it? Is it only one chapter? (Is that chapter short or substantial?) Is men's fitting and measurements discussed throughout the book or just in that one chapter?

I have the 3rd edition of this textbook, which was current way back when I took patternmaking in community college. Unfortunately, it had absolutely no mention of men's patterning and tailoring. It was all women's patterns except for a supposedly "unisex" section on pants which wasn't really unisex at all. (I tried drafting from it and just...no.) So while the pattern manipulation concepts in it are really good, it's usefulness for me personally was very limited in terms of slopers and fitting. I rarely use it unless I'm making something very weird.

I heard from a friend about the updates to the 5th edition, so I'm contemplating getting it. I'm digging for reviews and more info before I dish out the money though, since it's sold at textbook prices.[/QUOTE]

I do have the 5th edition. I'm not entirely sure of all the changes but, there is a men's section. It's not huge but it does cover all the basics. It's about 46 pages long and covers men's jacket foundations and designing with the blocks, a section on jacket construction; bespoke style, shirt foundations, casual shirts, vests, basic pant foundations and manipulations for trousers, slacks and jeans with a mini section on welt pockets. It seems to have a few pages on fitting analysis and corrections. Hope that helps!

#9 Evil Bishounen on 6 years ago

[QUOTE=bunny_Bri;4561366]I do have the 5th edition. I'm not entirely sure of all the changes but, there is a men's section. It's not huge but it does cover all the basics. It's about 46 pages long and covers men's jacket foundations and designing with the blocks, a section on jacket construction; bespoke style, shift foundations, casual shirts, bests, basic pant foundations and manipulations for trousers, slacks and jeans with a mini section on welt pockets. It seems to have a few pages on fitting analysis and corrections. Hope that helps![/QUOTE]

That's the one change I wanted info about :) and it sounds like it's got possibly everything I was looking for. Thanks!

#10 StarsOfCassiopeia on 6 years ago

I'll have to see if I can get a hold of that book, it sounds awesome!

Other than that, try starting with modification instead of complete drafting. Know that you need a poofy sleeve, but the only commercial pattern you can find has one that's too long? Cut it down! Need to add a collar to a jacket? Find something similar, but change that one detail!

With modification, if you screw up, you can usually still piece together what the original pattern was and re-start again from there if need-be. It's a good way to make semi-accurate patterns specific to multiple cosplays, and nail all those pesky details!