If you could get a five minute lesson from me, what would we cover?

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#1 Penlowe on 1 year ago

I am now in a position to be producing (simple) videos of sewing tips and techniques. Our first few are up: [url]https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfpL_bg02H_zKmEwKeveW-A[/url]

What would you like to see covered?

#2 nathancarter on 1 year ago

How find/choose the right fabrics for a particular design (existing character, OC, or commercial pattern). How to evaluate the reference material and decide what will work for the type of garment, the draping, the ease of wearing, the ease of working/sewing, and of course the price/availability.

Edit:
P.S. subscribed

#3 Scunosi on 1 year ago

[QUOTE=nathancarter;5064049]How find/choose the right fabrics for a particular design (existing character, OC, or commercial pattern). How to evaluate the reference material and decide what will work for the type of garment, the draping, the ease of wearing, the ease of working/sewing, and of course the price/availability.[/QUOTE]
Oh yes, this is something I still struggle with. I know how to sew, and I know a lot of basic techniques, but since I generally only sew for costumes I don't have much experience with all the different fabric types. So if I'm not going off a pattern that will tell me the suggested fabrics it's hard for me to figure out what to use without just asking other people. I personally prefer shopping for fabric in-person anyway (also due to my inexperience with it) but some stuff I've gone in totally clueless as to what I'm looking for other than color. And I know everyone using satin for everything back in the old days was apparently an "issue," so I'd like to learn more about the general types and weights of fabric and then maybe breaking it down more from there.

#4 Penlowe on 1 year ago

Ok, thanks! I'll take more suggestions as the boss wants to produce a LOT of videos. (this week I'm doing ironing)

Scunosi you aren't wrong, I know fabrics and I still prefer to shop in person. It could take a page to intimately describe a fabric while touching it for two seconds would convey all the same information. We've talked about doing a 'field trip' but need to get the hang of video editing better before we attempt that.

#5 SeeU on 1 year ago

I would like to see actual useful tips. Not the stupid "you can use small weights instead of pins" crap I see all over.

ideas:

The difference between pleats
How to do a proper french hem
tailors ham and how to use them for different things
The difference between using a cheap fabric vs a slightly more expensive one
Working with leather

#6 Penlowe on 1 year ago

Tomorrow I'm doing ironing and all it's tools, including the ham :) It should be up by Saturday morning.
great suggestions, thanks!

#7 lunaflora on 1 year ago

I think different seams and seam finishes would be a good video, like flat-felled, french, hong kong, bound, all that jazz. As well as which seams would be good for/not good for certain shapes and fabrics. like french seams for sheers but not necessarily for thick fabrics.

#8 Respawning on 1 year ago

I like all of these suggestions. How about (possibly basic and idiot questions but: ) when to use a serger vs sewing machine, how to rethread your serger (yes, I'm afraid of rethreading mine), when to use what different sewing machine feet/needles. Also, how to draft your own patterns (was this already suggested?), common mistakes/pitfalls and how to avoid/correct them. Tutorials on the more commonly difficult items for sewing (ie:gloves).

Really, I would watch almost anything as you have given me a lot of great advice on here.

#9 Penlowe on 1 year ago

:D Respawning I like your suggestions but none of them a five minute lessons, that's the hardest part, paring stuff down.
The time frame was set by my boss, so I'm not in charge of that. As it is she's going to edit yesterdays ironing down quite a bit, raw shoot was 10 minutes.

Yeah I have a serger and don't use it enough because it's such a serious p.i.t.a. to adjust the tension.... We have a serger lady that comes and does classes at our shop, but she's a contractor so I have to pay for the class like anyone else : pout:

#10 TheGoofQueen on 1 year ago

I hope it's okay to revive this thread; I was trying to think of something (because I always feel like I have questions for you, but blanked when I first saw the thread!) and finally came up with a couple!

First, a super basic rundown of lining a garment. Do you line the pattern pieces then sew them together? Or make two versions of the garment (lining and outer) and then sew those together? For some reason I can't wrap my head around linings even though I know they'd up my craftsmanship a lot, so a visual representation of that would be super helpful.

Also, a quick bit on when to use flat patterning versus when to draft on a model (yourself or a dress form). Does it depend entirely on personal preference, or are some garments easier to draft one way or the other? That sort of thing would be really helpful to a pattern-drafting newbie like me!

#11 lunaflora on 1 year ago

[QUOTE=TheGoofQueen;5064770]I hope it's okay to revive this thread; I was trying to think of something (because I always feel like I have questions for you, but blanked when I first saw the thread!) and finally came up with a couple!

First, a super basic rundown of lining a garment. Do you line the pattern pieces then sew them together? Or make two versions of the garment (lining and outer) and then sew those together? For some reason I can't wrap my head around linings even though I know they'd up my craftsmanship a lot, so a visual representation of that would be super helpful.

Also, a quick bit on when to use flat patterning versus when to draft on a model (yourself or a dress form). Does it depend entirely on personal preference, or are some garments easier to draft one way or the other? That sort of thing would be really helpful to a pattern-drafting newbie like me![/QUOTE]

Lining the pieces themselves before sewing them together is actually called underlining. You would use this for adding more structure to the fabric, or if you want to add boning not visible on the outside. It's like interfacing, but you're doing it to the entire thing instead of just parts of it. You can have a garment that is both underlined and lined.
.

#12 Penlowe on 1 year ago

[QUOTE]First, a super basic rundown of lining a garment.... Also, a quick bit on when to use flat patterning versus when to draft on a model[/QUOTE]
Those are excellent questions :)

I may be able to hit both but I'm not sure how advanced my boss wants to go with these videos.

I'll offer a short answer to both.

I had the great pleasure of serving as a judge for this years National Make It With Wool competition, and boy did I see some amazing garments! and lots of linings. [url]http://www.nationalmakeitwithwool.com/[/url]
Want to be blown away? these are the Junior competitors, thus none over 16, most are wearing 2 or more pieces they made [url]https://www.facebook.com/makeitwithwool/photos/a.478509548875303.105788.170128016380126/1689720014420911/?type=3&theater[/url]

LINING: Are you lining it to:
A) make it just as beautiful on the inside as the outside?
B) it's itchy/ grabby/some other surface I don't want on my bare skin?
C) It needs it's structural integrity bolstered?

For A and B, you want traditional lining, which means no seam allowances are visible. The order of operations sewing a lining into a garment depends on the project, but generally it's: make the garment, make the lining, sew right sides together & turn (a VERY simplified version).
For occasions where C is the need, underlining is of course best, heck I'd even advocate using some sort of fabric appropriate adhesive (Wonder Under, Quilters Basting Spray) to make it all come together even easier.
BUT if pretty is your goal, stay with traditional linings.
If you underline something that doesn't really need it, you are more or less wasting time and money.
If you underline instead of line and it's for competition, you're shooting holes in your own boat.
And yes you can underline AND line the same garment. Usually this happens when one is making something like a coat or armor type garment. If you are doing Jon Snow (Game of Thrones) and your faux fur is scratchy on the inside, that calls for the underlining, but he is also Castle Raised and accustomed to good quality things, thus the lining, because he would have a lined fur cloak.

Draping and Drafting:

Traditional flat patterning relies heavily on math. The good news is most people get the hang of it eventually which means almost anyone can flat pattern (given enough practice). Some things are just too darned hard to drape, like pants, and thus pretty much have to be flat patterned anyway.

Draping comes very naturally to a small segment of the population because it requires three dimensional thinking. The bad news is 60% of humans aren't wired for 3D thinking at all, they can't even learn it. Here's a quickie to see if it's something you can learn or if it will always be a struggle: [url]https://www.123test.com/spatial-reasoning-test/[/url]
If you've got it, awesome :) If not, don't fret, just brush up on your math skills, flat patterning is best for you.

So if you are wired for draping, I'll offer these tips:
- Use the actual body whenever possible, no two people are shaped quite exactly alike.
- Dress forms are nice tools to have, but as stated above, not really shaped like anyone. Modify it with padding to get it as close to you/ whoever you are sewing for as possible.
- make a duct tape dress form if you can, so you have your exact shape.

#13 TheGoofQueen on 1 year ago

Wow, thank you both for those answers! That's a much simpler way of looking at things than most of the tutorials I came across. (That Make It With Wool competition looks incredible, they all did such great work! And I answered 6 of 10 correctly on that spatial reasoning test, which is better than I thought I'd do after looking at the first one! Ha!)

If you do end up doing videos on those topics, I'll definitely tune in. But even if not, thanks again for the quick rundown! I feel much better about giving linings and drafting a try now. :)

#14 Penlowe on 1 year ago

I like this format, sorta like the old "stump the teacher" game. Do you guys mind if I migrate these questions over to my blog?
I'm going to backtrack and address some of the other questions too.

[QUOTE] How about when to use a serger vs sewing machine, [/QUOTE]
Sergers are fast and use a dual feed method, making them very smooth operators with knits. That said many modern sewing machines, even in the low price ranges, now come with stretch stitch settings, overlock stitches, optional walking feet, and even a double needle, making the serger not entirely necessary. If you do a lot of sewing where the serger is useful, but also transition back to straight stitch, having two machines is nice provided you have the finances and room for both. I got a serger years ago before upgrading my sewing machine. After I got the sewing machine with all those settings, I found I'd rather spend the time changing feet than rearranging whole machines on tables. My serger has become a doorstop.
All that said, serger vs. machine actually boils down to your useage more than the machine itself.

[QUOTE]how to rethread your serger (yes, I'm afraid of rethreading mine), [/QUOTE]
Get out your manual! Or search for the manufacturers' videos. They will have the best answers. I know how to thread mine, but that doesn't mean it'll be the same for you. Plus mine is getting old.
[QUOTE]when to use what different sewing machine feet/needles. [/QUOTE]
This is a broad question. I'll be happy to give targeted answers to specific projects. That said I use medium sized Universal needles on 90% of projects. Denim needles on denim, leather needles on leather, faux leather/ vinyl, and fur/ faux fur.
The tricky one is ball point needles and stretch needles, because stretch needles are ball pointed.
Ball point[U] needles are for knits,[/U] like tee shirt jersey, and sweatshirt knit fabrics.
Stretch needles are a different shape on that ball pointed tip, specifically designed for elasticized fabrics like [U]spandex and lycra[/U].
[QUOTE]Also, how to draft your own patterns (was this already suggested?), common mistakes/pitfalls and how to avoid/correct them. Tutorials on the more commonly difficult items for sewing (ie:gloves). [/QUOTE]
The first and last are pretty much college courses, not really something easily addressed in this format. the middle is what my blog touches on regularly.

#15 TheGoofQueen on 1 year ago

Personally, I don't mind my questions migrating to your blog. Especially if that allows for even more precise answers, I'm all for it!

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