Artorias Questions

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#1 doubledarcy on 8 months ago

I've always wanted to try and make an armored cosplay, so I thought that maybe I'd try and make one in time for Katsucon 2019. I've been doing a lot of research, but do have to remaining questions that I can't seem to figure out an answer to.

1) I was wondering how to attach his helmet to his hood and stabilize it on my head so that it didn't go sliding off?

2) I was thinking I could get away with jeans or something for the lower half because of the reference images. But what would you guys suggest when it came to a top for under the armor?

Thank you so much!

Reference:

[url]https://cdnb.artstation.com/p/assets/images/images/000/515/441/large/chang-gon-shin-darksoul-003.jpg?1443931288[/url]

#2 Penlowe on 8 months ago

There are a lot of ways to attach a soft material to a hard one, but if it's EVA foam build I'd probably use large snaps or chicago screws. You can glue one part to the foam and sew/ slip through a hole in the fabric.

Jeans would be bulky and uncomfortable, you want leggings of some kind. I'd look for something matte and soft over fancy athletic type.

#3 nathancarter on 8 months ago

[QUOTE=Penlowe;5068208] you want leggings of some kind. I'd look for something matte and soft over fancy athletic type.[/QUOTE]

...and with pockets.

#4 nathancarter on 8 months ago

Your selection for the top and bottom of the undersuit are going to be somewhat dependent on how you plan to strap or attach the armor.

It's vital that you plan your strapping and support harnesses BEFORE working on the armor. Ideally, your armor pieces will all strap to each other, and be supported by your waist and shoulders. In some cases, the character design simply doesn't permit that, so you have to attach the armor pieces to the undersuit, by way of velcro or snaps.

Fortunately, Based on your reference picture, it looks like you won't need to attach much of anything to the undersuit - there are visible straps and buckles on many of the pieces. You'll still need to design strapping and attachments for the rest of it where the straps aren't shown.

There's a chainmail undersuit peeking out at the elbows and knees. If you don't want to do real chainmail (probably not, if this is your first armor costume) then make a shirt and pants out of something like this:
[url]https://www.joann.com/yaya-han-cosplay-fabric-59-gray-chainmaille-print/15328909.html[/url]


Unsolicited opinion:
This costume is a HUGE undertaking for someone who has never made armor before.
If you start NOW and don't procrastinate, you can have it wearable by Katsucon.

#5 doubledarcy on 8 months ago

[QUOTE=Penlowe;5068208]There are a lot of ways to attach a soft material to a hard one, but if it's EVA foam build I'd probably use large snaps or chicago screws. You can glue one part to the foam and sew/ slip through a hole in the fabric.

Jeans would be bulky and uncomfortable, you want leggings of some kind. I'd look for something matte and soft over fancy athletic type.[/QUOTE]

That sounds like a great idea when it comes to the top piece. I was thinking something similar last night myself! You're right about the jeans, I think I've just been worried that everything will slip down somehow even if I attach it because I'm paranoid! Thank you so much!

#6 doubledarcy on 8 months ago

[QUOTE=nathancarter;5068211]Your selection for the top and bottom of the undersuit are going to be somewhat dependent on how you plan to strap or attach the armor.

It's vital that you plan your strapping and support harnesses BEFORE working on the armor. Ideally, your armor pieces will all strap to each other, and be supported by your waist and shoulders. In some cases, the character design simply doesn't permit that, so you have to attach the armor pieces to the undersuit, by way of velcro or snaps.

Fortunately, Based on your reference picture, it looks like you won't need to attach much of anything to the undersuit - there are visible straps and buckles on many of the pieces. You'll still need to design strapping and attachments for the rest of it where the straps aren't shown.

There's a chainmail undersuit peeking out at the elbows and knees. If you don't want to do real chainmail (probably not, if this is your first armor costume) then make a shirt and pants out of something like this:
[url]https://www.joann.com/yaya-han-cosplay-fabric-59-gray-chainmaille-print/15328909.html[/url]


Unsolicited opinion:
This costume is a HUGE undertaking for someone who has never made armor before.
If you start NOW and don't procrastinate, you can have it wearable by Katsucon.[/QUOTE]
I considered having the front and back detachable via velcro at the shoulders for the chest piece, then the sides held together by leather straps. I'm strugging with that idea though, because I keep seeing different concept art where he doesn't have straps at all at his sides where as on some he does.For the thigh pieces I thought about straps that hook up under the chest piece to support them and then so I could get them on, maybe elastic around there as well? I'm trying to do as much research as I can to try and have this done well! I'm very afraid when it comes to durability.


For the chainmail, I considered using that mesh grip you put under rugs to keep it from sliding, and weathering it with acrylic? For the pieces that hang down and look broken, I did see that there are plastic loops you can hook together that are much lighter, however I don't know if that would be smart to consider since Katsucon isn't too far away from now. I haven't been able to think of anything that would replicate chainmail better for those pieces since they're straggly. Do you have any ideas?

I do like the thought of the chainmail fabric, I might use it since I'm not sure how I'd go about layering it under the armor, especially on the backs of my knees.

I totally agree, I think I'm being unrealistic when it comes to this costume. I'm really hoping I can somehow pull it off. I keep telling myself that I'm a petite 5 foot girl so I won't have to use so many materials... but I'm sure that's not true! (Considering I really wanted to make his greatsword too).

If you have any other advice for someone taking on an insane project like this, please let me know!

#7 nathancarter on 8 months ago

[QUOTE=doubledarcy;5068216]If you have any other advice for someone taking on an insane project like this, please let me know![/QUOTE]

Advice after completing my biggest and most elaborate armor project yet:
[url]https://imgur.com/gallery/AUXZgJ6[/url]

It will take 2-3 times as long as cost 3-5 times as much as you expect. Schedule and budget accordingly. (after 5 years of experience, I got my schedule right, but went over budget by about 50%)

One of the most difficult parts in making costume armor, is making templates that fit your body and give you the right silhouette. So, make the whole thing out of cardboard and blue tape first. Cardboard is practically free, easy to work with, and you can easily revise pieces and scrap ones that don't fit. Once you have it wearable and properly-fitting in cardboard, use those pieces as templates for your foam or sintra.

Often, you have to take practical liberties with shapes, sizes, and strapping to make an imaginary character into a real-world costume. Animated characters don't have to adhere to real-world physics and gravity. Make adjustments where you need to.

Decide what kind of materials you'd like to use, and WHY you want to use them, and do a ton of research and watch videos on them. All costume-armor materials have pros and cons. EVA foam is popular; it's a good middle-ground of price, availability, and ease-of-use. Worbla is popular but better for smaller props; for a large and complex armor build it'll be prohibitively expensive, plus it's very time- and labor-intensive to get a smooth finish. I use sintra (pvc foam sheet) almost exclusively for armor; it's about the same price as EVA, but has different properties and different construction techniques.

Punished Props and Evil Ted channels on Youtube are fantastic goldmines of information, especially if you decide to use EVA foam.

#8 Dictamnus Albus on 8 months ago

the chainmaile in question uses really big rings in this case,
(relative to "real" maile wich is near pencil size in diameter)

if those key rings come in bulk at a cheap(ish) price,
get a few hundred quarter sized rings

it should remain light, and not snag much

using such large rings shoud alleviate issues with the armpits and back of knee
since theres alot more slip than with normal size rings

an alternate material for the plate armour would be "hardened paper"
instead of foams, you can take cardstock (110# - 199g/m2)
coat with glue (pva/white/school) and stack 5 sheets place under even weight
and let dry
(24hrs still formable (will tear less and curl tighter on its own if left alone)
72hrs should be dry enough to take from under weight and use,
may still bow if left unused and not under weight)

cut with "hobby knife" the thin blades cut cleaner than utility
(coated blades do dull slower, and are worth the extra pocket change)
(beware blade slippage from standard knife handles)

also, its quasi-historically accurate, as some "samurai" armours were made from
layerd paper and painted with laquer

tutorial reguarding hardened paper, [url]https://youtu.be/A9twzsSILUk?t=345[/url]

#9 doubledarcy on 7 months ago

[QUOTE=nathancarter;5068221]Advice after completing my biggest and most elaborate armor project yet:
[url]https://imgur.com/gallery/AUXZgJ6[/url]

It will take 2-3 times as long as cost 3-5 times as much as you expect. Schedule and budget accordingly. (after 5 years of experience, I got my schedule right, but went over budget by about 50%)

One of the most difficult parts in making costume armor, is making templates that fit your body and give you the right silhouette. So, make the whole thing out of cardboard and blue tape first. Cardboard is practically free, easy to work with, and you can easily revise pieces and scrap ones that don't fit. Once you have it wearable and properly-fitting in cardboard, use those pieces as templates for your foam or sintra.

Often, you have to take practical liberties with shapes, sizes, and strapping to make an imaginary character into a real-world costume. Animated characters don't have to adhere to real-world physics and gravity. Make adjustments where you need to.

Decide what kind of materials you'd like to use, and WHY you want to use them, and do a ton of research and watch videos on them. All costume-armor materials have pros and cons. EVA foam is popular; it's a good middle-ground of price, availability, and ease-of-use. Worbla is popular but better for smaller props; for a large and complex armor build it'll be prohibitively expensive, plus it's very time- and labor-intensive to get a smooth finish. I use sintra (pvc foam sheet) almost exclusively for armor; it's about the same price as EVA, but has different properties and different construction techniques.

Punished Props and Evil Ted channels on Youtube are fantastic goldmines of information, especially if you decide to use EVA foam.[/QUOTE]
This is absolutely amazing! Beautiful work! Thank you for that, I think I had in mind it wouldn't cost as much as other cosplays, but I think that might only be relative when it comes to commissioning someone, now.

Cardboard is such a fantastic idea! I actually just picked some up since you suggested fromw here I work. Perfect!

I'll have to look into both types as well as their channels, thank you so much for this information!

I do have one more question! What foam width in mm would you say is the best for making the armor?

#10 doubledarcy on 7 months ago

[QUOTE=Dictamnus Albus;5068230]the chainmaile in question uses really big rings in this case,
(relative to "real" maile wich is near pencil size in diameter)

if those key rings come in bulk at a cheap(ish) price,
get a few hundred quarter sized rings

it should remain light, and not snag much

using such large rings shoud alleviate issues with the armpits and back of knee
since theres alot more slip than with normal size rings

an alternate material for the plate armour would be "hardened paper"
instead of foams, you can take cardstock (110# - 199g/m2)
coat with glue (pva/white/school) and stack 5 sheets place under even weight
and let dry
(24hrs still formable (will tear less and curl tighter on its own if left alone)
72hrs should be dry enough to take from under weight and use,
may still bow if left unused and not under weight)

cut with "hobby knife" the thin blades cut cleaner than utility
(coated blades do dull slower, and are worth the extra pocket change)
(beware blade slippage from standard knife handles)

also, its quasi-historically accurate, as some "samurai" armours were made from
layerd paper and painted with laquer

tutorial reguarding hardened paper, [url]https://youtu.be/A9twzsSILUk?t=345[/url][/QUOTE]
Thank you so much! I never even knew this was a thing! I'll have to look into it more!

#11 DlGlT on 7 months ago

Another material for the chainmaile would be PVC rings. You can either buy pre-cut ones or make your own.

#12 nathancarter on 7 months ago

[QUOTE=doubledarcy;5068237]I do have one more question! What foam width in mm would you say is the best for making the armor?[/QUOTE]

I'm not very experienced in EVA foam so I can't really answer for that material.

Were I to use PVC foam sheet (sintra), I'd use 6mm (1/4") sheet for pieces that need to be structural components, need to "feel" heavier and thicker, and are simpler to form. In this case, I'd probably use it for the front layer of the chest plate, and the top layer of the shoulder pauldron. Possibly also: the hip plates, the top curved plate of the knee armor, the ankle plate, and some of the top helmet pieces.

For everything else, I'd use 3mm (1/8") sheet - it's cheaper, and way easier to cut and shape.

On the Assaultron, I used 6mm Sintra for the main chest and back parts (not the inserts); the face plates and some of the structure of the helmet; and the ankle/upper-foot armor. Most of the rest is 3mm Sintra. Some parts that would have been hard to hand-form from Sintra, are made of 1.5mm styrene, vac-formed.

#13 Dictamnus Albus on 7 months ago

[url]http://junkerscosplay.blogspot.com/[/url]
[url]https://www.youtube.com/user/FinalCosplayCorps/featured[/url]
[url]https://www.youtube.com/user/punishedprops/featured[/url]
[url]https://www.youtube.com/user/epicfantasy[/url]

these are good channels to keep in your cosplay rollerdex

(punished props has a vid on hiding seams)

for eva foam, from what i understand (i havent worked it either)
the standard source anti-fatigue mats (interlocking squares, rolls tend to be a PITA)
(harbor freight usually cheapest unless buying larger squarefootage)
is marked as 1/2 inch, but measures only 3/8 or 1cm (unless it expands out of package)

this is about as thick as youd want to work with as far as shaping,
but stacking pieces afterward as to get a WoW cartoony oversize aesthetic is just fine

also if you can see a "raw" edge on the foam, the larger the air bubbles the more
it will shrink and deform irregularly from heat forming
so while working something like "foam camping mat" is just fine
be aware it may move unexpectedly when shaping

oh, heads up, foam dulls the crap out of knives,
start with a fresh section of a snapoff knife and as soon as the cuts start looking unclean, break into a new section
it seems more wastefull that it really is, the blades are cheap enough to just toss, but if you must use them
the segments fit into the larger hobby knife handles, and function as something between a #18 (wide flat top) and a #19 (angled)

#14 nathancarter on 7 months ago

Great post.

Junkers Cosplay uses a lot of Sintra, he was (and continues to be) my inspiration and goals.

Punished Props is a fantastic channel all around.

Evil Ted also bears mentioning here:
[url]https://www.youtube.com/user/evilted40/[/url]

I just recently made some things from Harbor Freight floor mats. It's easy to use, to make big, lightweight, semi-flexible things quickly and cheaply. If your piece needs to be flexible, it's a great choice. However, if you want your piece to be rigid, the Harbor Freight floor mats are not a good choice.

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