Getting wrinkles out of leather/pleather

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#1 Killmesarah on 14 years ago

Yo
I started my Lulu costume, and the material I bought is a fake leather(pleather?). I know heat will probably melt or warp it, so....
Does anyone know a good technique to get wrinkles and unwanted pleats out of pleather?
Thanks in advance!

-S

#2 Miaka No Baka on 14 years ago

some people recommending throwing it over your shower curtain rod after you've showred and let the steamyness of the room help let the wrinkles fall out with out causing heat damage. Some pleathers can be ironed on very low settings as long as you iron it on the backside which usually has some type of fabric backing, check the bolt you got it off of to see if they recommend it.

Miaka no Baka

#3 Tentacle_Guy on 14 years ago

Real leather isn't going to wrinkle. Some of the very thin kid skin leather may get crumpled, but as long as you hang the garment up, the kinks usually work themselves out. Weighting the bottom of the garment (if practical) will speed up the process.

You can iron pleather. Just throw a towel or cotton sheet over it, and set the iron on low. Don't leave the iron in one place very long, and be prepared to be at it a while.

#4 Crimson Deity on 14 years ago

I don't like to risk melting since I'm not the greatest with an iron, so I just hang my pleather up in such a way that it's not folded and leave it for a week or so. Usually the wrinkles work their way most of the way out. It sort of depends on how severe the wrinkles are though. I've been lucky so far and the only ones I've had to deal with are ones caused by the fabric being folded for shipping.

#5 newmyu on 14 years ago

I've been told by several places NOT to iron pleather or vinyl, because it can cause the glue on the fabric backing to come loose. They said it might not happen right away, but eventually will due to the weakening of the glue (apparently, it's attached initially using heat, and exposure to high temperatures from an iron or steamer can cause the glue to melt or something.. o.O;; )

I would say to compress it under a stack of books or something for a few days... I would imagine that would help a lot.. ^^;

#6 Kagematsuri on 14 years ago

Tentacle Guy is right, if you need to iron pleather or vinyl just toss a rather thick towel over it and carefully iron it. I did that with my vinyl and it worked perfectly well.

#7 Parasaurolophus on 14 years ago

I've heard that you should let it rest flat for 24 hours before cutting it- right now, i have it rolled up in a giant tube while I'm waiting, so hopefully any folds will have relaxed.
Now, does anyone have suggestions for getting rid of scuffs? The pleather I purchased seems to have some slightly off color staining on it.

#8 silverwolf on 14 years ago

When I got my pleather, it was all stuffed into a box and wrinkled, but not too badly. What I did was throw a piece of scrap fabric over it and ironed it over that. If you iron it straight on, it'll stick. Keep it on a low setting and work the crinkles out patiently and don't put too much pressure on it.

#9 Pink Bunnie on 14 years ago

Everybodys right. Either lay some fabric down over it or iron from behind. When I use pleather I iron all my seams this way. :P I just can't stand seams that don't lay flat.

Low setting keep the iron moving. Just be super careful its really easy to set the iron too high and damage the fabric. Practice on some scraps if you have some scraps left over.

#10 R1KKu on 14 years ago

Stupid question, but would any of these methods work for pvc? The fabric has some minor kinks/wrinkles in it; they're not really noticeable when the fabric is stretched, but Im afraid to take any chances :sulk:

#11 Tentacle_Guy on 14 years ago

yes they will, pleather and PVC have very similar properties when it comes to heat. (psssssst. some stuff that is advertised as pleather is actually PVC. PVC being poly vinyl chloride)

#12 Ling-Ling on 14 years ago

[QUOTE=Parasaurolophus]I've heard that you should let it rest flat for 24 hours before cutting it- right now, i have it rolled up in a giant tube while I'm waiting, so hopefully any folds will have relaxed.
Now, does anyone have suggestions for getting rid of scuffs? The pleather I purchased seems to have some slightly off color staining on it.[/QUOTE]

if you have a store that sells Doc Martin boots nearby, you can go there and buy some of the balm they give you with the shoes/boots. it works on getting most scuffs off.

#13 archangeli on 14 years ago

[QUOTE=Parasaurolophus]
Now, does anyone have suggestions for getting rid of scuffs? The pleather I purchased seems to have some slightly off color staining on it.[/QUOTE]


I use a shoe cleaning product called "Suds" from Aldo. The only reason I use that over others is because the product comes with a brush-scrubber top so you can work the scuffs and stains out.

#14 Parasaurolophus on 14 years ago

Hmmm... what about Armor All? It is used to dust and clean plastics in cars. My problem- there are slight scuffs where the pleather was folded, and I can't use water (or windex) because the color literally comes off with minimal rubbing. A wax-based product, like the doc martins boot stuff seems a little excessive, b/c i won't soak in, but now Im thinking I need to seal the whole fabric so the color stays.
Im sad cause it wasn't cheap, and the color looks so nice as it is!! :(

#15 Parasaurolophus on 14 years ago

So I finally dragged myself to walmart on a whim. I went to the auto section and bought some of Turtle Wax's interior cleaner (called Z21 or something). Its used for cleaning and protecting the dashboard and leather/pleather seats in cars. Brought it home... and hey! it works pretty well. It has smoothed out the color, cleaned up the scuffs, and if anything, enhanced the general look of the pleather. It also made it shinier, but there are matte versions from Armor all. So this is another option for cleaning/buffing pleather and PVC.

... plus, it protects against UV rays. heh

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