Regaining muscle in thigh?

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#1 wolfspeaker on 10 years ago

So 4 weeks ago I was hit by a car which has left me with three torn ligaments in my knee
I currently cant bend my knee or put weight on that leg so obviously what I can do is limited and I am currently waiting to see a specialist for surgery

I need to desperatly regain muscle mass and strength in my thigh as I have lost alot and I can barely stop my leg trembling when ever I do anything

I have been told to try leg raises but was given no other guidance

Can anyone on here give me any guidance on what to do? anyone know what kind of leg raises I should be trying or how many I should be doing etc?

#2 merquryd on 10 years ago

You should probably see a doctor or physical therapist.

Get well! That's a terrible thing that happened to you.

#3 Arti on 10 years ago

Edit: I do agree with the above post with finding the best ways to rehab before doing this on your own:

First thing that came to mind with doing leg raises or any other exercise utilizing them was swimming. You could do leg raises in the water with the resistance of the water as is, or with a couple of floaties at the ankles for added resistance. Other things come to mind was flutter kicking while treading or swimming with a paddleboard.

Second, leg raises can be done while hanging just as if you're doing pike leg raises (legs straight, of course!), Usually this involves a lot of core strength too since you're not supported by the other leg, so this is mostly for core strength than thighs. If you have access to a dip station, you can do leg raises with less emphasis on the core since the entire uppoer body is supported rather than just the arms: (Google Image: "Dip Station")

Alas, swimming is the best way to go imo for your thigs given the situation. For now, just providing your thighs work will start the growing process and gradually increase the resistance, intensity, or duration so you always feel a challenge.

Best of luck with the rehabilitation (o I would seek any advice from a therapist as well from the previous post).

#4 32spartan11 on 10 years ago

[QUOTE=wolfspeaker;3896208]So 4 weeks ago I was hit by a car which has left me with three torn ligaments in my knee
I currently cant bend my knee or put weight on that leg so obviously what I can do is limited and I am currently waiting to see a specialist for surgery

I need to desperatly regain muscle mass and strength in my thigh as I have lost alot and I can barely stop my leg trembling when ever I do anything

I have been told to try leg raises but was given no other guidance

Can anyone on here give me any guidance on what to do? anyone know what kind of leg raises I should be trying or how many I should be doing etc?[/QUOTE]

First thing is check with your doctor to see what he wants you to do.

I had surgery on my knee previously and the most important thing is to get your range of motion back first. Both regular and hyper extension (normally your leg can somewhat, though not everyone can)

Two stretches would be the seated hamstring stretches. Which is the injured leg straight out and lean forward to stretch the hamstring. You can press on the knee if needed.

[IMG]http://static.howstuffworks.com/gif/stretching-15.jpg[/IMG]

the other is heal slides. While seated with a slight bend in your leg slowly pull (slide) your heel to your butt. To make this easier at first you can use a strap and put it on your foot and pull.

[IMG]http://www.sports-injury-info.com/image-files/heel-slide-pull.jpg[/IMG]

Hold each for 25-30 seconds and repeat. After I got surgery they said I couldn't stretch my knee enough, I did it 2 or 3 different sessions a day and stretched it for 3 sets of 30 seconds each session.

You can also do different types of leg raise lying on you back and flexing your quad raise you leg, pointing your toes towards or away from you will change how it works your muscles I used to do 6-7 or both each set.



Then lay on your side with the injured leg on top and raise your leg. do that for about 12 reps if possible, switch sides with your injured leg on the bottom and stabilize with your good leg

[IMG]http://abc.eznettools.net/D303427/X341259/AdductionSideLegRaises-color.jpg[/IMG]

#5 wolfspeaker on 10 years ago

Thanks for your replies

It was one of the staff I saw at the hosptial who told me to do the leg raises but not how to do them

I will definatly try some of your suggestions and see what works

#6 leftalone on 10 years ago

If your ligament has been torn you shouldn't be even really working out. I tore my MCL and was off for 3 months (I also had torn meniscus aswell.)While isometric exercises are great and the leg raises work your quads you need to be extremely careful. If you start to do to much your going to create swelling and scar tissue build up.

Before you do anything you really should check with a doctor.

#7 Jungfrau on 10 years ago

Check with your doctor first before you do anything. You don't want to end up injuring yourself more by taking advice from internet forums and people who aren't experienced, licensed physicians. (Not that they can't be helpful! I'm just saying, chances are we don't know what's best for you)

Seriously. See what your doctor says. It would be horrible if you do more damage to yourself.

Get well soon. :(

#8 32spartan11 on 10 years ago

[QUOTE=leftalone;3902292]If your ligament has been torn you shouldn't be even really working out. I tore my MCL and was off for 3 months (I also had torn meniscus aswell.)While isometric exercises are great and the leg raises work your quads you need to be extremely careful. If you start to do to much your going to create swelling and scar tissue build up.

Before you do anything you really should check with a doctor.[/QUOTE]

Completely not true first scar tissue is created once an injury occurs, re injury would create more scar tissue, not working out. Though swelling could be an issue. Ice should be applied immediately after the therapy session.

I worked out intensely before getting my surgery. I increased my squat by over 100lbs in the 3 months I was working out before surgery. I started this program after it was already torn for 3 months. I usually biked for 10-15 squatted for 4 sets going did lunges for three leg extension and leg curls and calf raises on leg days. This helped me bounce back and heal very quickly.

Granted my injury wasn't nearly as bad as I had only tore my ACL and their was no other structural damage. But I know there is a lot of pre-surgery rehab that patients were doing at my physical therapy facility because i would talk with them about their injury and what to expect after surgery.

Again I would check with a doctor before anything as so many have said.

I left this out before but one of the best ways to help with range of motion is the exercise bike. Start with the seat high so your knee doesn't have to bend and lower it as it gets easier.

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