camera review

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#1 NaughtsApproach on 5 years ago

I am wanting to get a Nikon D3200
It looks absolutely amazing and seems like it would be a great camera for high quality cosplay photography. But even though it seems awesome, there has to be some draw back. I'm suspicious of an awesome camera with 24 megapixels for less than $600

So can any one give me a review of this camera? give me some positives and negatives?
Will it be a good camera to get high quality beautiful cosplay photography?

#2 nathancarter on 5 years ago

Experienced Opinion: In portraiture (including cosplay photography) the camera body is less important than the lighting, pose, expression, and setting. From an equipment standpoint, lens is more important than camera body.

If your lighting is good - and this can include natural or ambient lighting, not just flashes - then you can make good portraits with even an inexpensive camera and lens. If the lighting and pose are sub-par, even the most expensive camera won't magically transform it info an interesting portrait.

#3 SolarTempest on 5 years ago

Good: Image quality, great resolution, dynamic range.
Bad: Smaller viewfinder, only one control dial on the back/limited controls.

=)

#4 Brea on 5 years ago

Get a Canon. If you ever want to switch to video, you'll thank me.

#5 Surfsama on 5 years ago

#6 Ito on 5 years ago

As the saying goes, "the best camera is the one that you have with you" :P

I wouldn't worry too much about getting the perfect DSLR right off of the bat. It will take you a while to get used to the features, and the limitations this one has probably won't hold you back for a while, and by then if you are still in to photography, you will want to buy a new one XD

In my opinion, I would look at the two different main camera systems, Nikon or Canon, and pick between those two. If any of your friends already shoot either Canon or Nikon, I would shoot the same system as your friend so that you can swap gear and lenses :D

#7 CatoA on 5 years ago

A dSLR doesn't need to be new or high in megapixels to be good. For $600 there are a couple nice options, I would suggest either one of the slightly older canon rebels (t2i/t3i are both good cameras for $400-ish these days) and using the savings to pick up a couple prime (non-zoom) lenses. Of course, you should always remember the two rules of SLR Photography:

A) Lens quality is more important than camera body quality.
B) Lighting quality is more important than lens quality.

Funtime option: Get a canon 5D classic and a 50mm prime, enjoy glorious portrait quality and despair at your total inability to shoot in dim conditions.

#8 Av4rice on 5 years ago

[QUOTE=CatoA;4750586]Get a canon 5D classic and a 50mm prime, enjoy glorious portrait quality and despair at your total inability to shoot in dim conditions.[/QUOTE]

Actually the old 5D should still be better than the T3i for ISO noise. It only goes up to 3200, though. And a prime will of course beat a kit lens in low light.

#9 CatoA on 5 years ago

[QUOTE=Av4rice;4750671]Actually the old 5D should still be better than the T3i for ISO noise. It only goes up to 3200, though. And a prime will of course beat a kit lens in low light.[/QUOTE]

This is true, yeah. Been a long time since I've personally used full frame so I've kinda forgotten all of the fun benefits. Personally though I would never even risk bringing the ISO on a dslr that high, digital noise is not nearly as nice looking as film grain.

#10 Flinn on 5 years ago

You can shoot cosplay with any kind of dslr. It's the lens that matters most.

#11 peterwem on 5 years ago

[IMG]http://kameratrollet.se/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/IMG_46821.jpg[/IMG]
It's all about the light. What camera you use is not as important as the rest of your equipment.
The picture above:

Speedlite (naked) from the left that with the light hit her legs. Speedlite (softboxed) from my right with the light that hit her whole body.

#12 peterwem on 5 years ago

[QUOTE=Flinn;4760356]You can shoot cosplay with any kind of dslr. It's the lens that matters most.[/QUOTE]

Lens and the flashes.

#13 nicolaskn on 5 years ago

If you're going to spend about $600+(Don't forget Tax) don't get the Nikion or Cannon Ti models. A used 5D Mark ii will be superior to both these cameras even though the cost is higher. Used around ($700-$800), if I'm not mistaken.

Personally I use a Sony Nex 6, which is a APS-C Sensor camera. 5D ii > NEX 6, but that's because of the sensor size. For convention I recommend a mirrorless camera, they're light, and cheaper(depending on the model).

Here are my photos from my Sony NEX 5N, before I upgraded to the NEX 6.

No flash, lights supplied by sparklers
[IMG]http://pcdn.500px.net/20834165/a89b1ff0e3bb61b1d1c53a1517ce0d7b36a5bb24/5.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://pcdn.500px.net/31987735/a4e0162b7b740a0400b7f42c6c1d819bac8660b6/5.jpg[/IMG]

#14 WonJohnSoup on 5 years ago

Most DSLRs now are well beyond the capability of 99% of users. The new battle ground appears to be in the video arena.

Any Nikon DSLR you won't have to be suspicious of. Unless you get heavily into studio and strobe lighting work or video, they're all fairly interchangeable. Same with the Canons. I've slowly inched my way up the ladder with Canon bodies from the bottom of the line Rebels to the near top of the line 6D and the reasons are because of 1) video and 2) image quality at higher ISOs and 3) radio control of off camera flash units.

If you don't think you'll ever hit any of the those, a bottom end Canon DSLR is perfectly fine and you'll never be able to tell on screen what camera which image came from. Literally. The image quality between the lowest Canon DSLR and highest DSLR (about a $4000 difference) on the computer screen at normal daily use ISOs is LITERALLY imperceptible to 99% of casual viewers on the internet, no exaggeration.

My concern would be going with a DSLR or mirror-less. If you suspect you'll always be a casual snap shooter/hallway shooter, get the mirror-less, maybe a Sony NEX series. IF you think you want to go that extra step up to flash work (not that expensive, maybe $250 total investment for two strobes, radio triggers and light stands), get the DSLR. The difference in being able to control your lighting and having a "direct connection to your camera" to apply photographic lighting theory makes a far bigger difference to the final composition than the image quality of the camera.

I would take a bottom of the line DSLR with two cheap radio-triggered flashes over a top of the line DSLR with no flash any day, no hesitation.

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