Is My Dutch-Tilt Photo a Hit or Miss?

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#31 brucer007 on 6 years ago

@ [U]Blood Red Rain[/U]

I don't think this last photo you posted would qualify as a dutch tilt. It has diagonal lines from how the bodies are composed, but there is no apparent tilt of the scenery, to the left or to the right. The camera was tilted to look down at the ground without it being directly pointing downward, so it is tilted, but it is not a Dutch Tilt.

Look at some examples in this forum, and/or try google images.

Here is another example of a Dutch Tilt from my gallery here at Cosplay.com:
Notice the diagonal lines in the scenery, tilting from left to right and right to left.

[IMG]http://photo.cosplay.com/150562/1854807.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://images.cosplay.com/photos/29/2972716.jpg[/IMG]

#32 claudillama on 6 years ago

[QUOTE=nathancarter;4572587]In terms of framing the subject, the tilt is fine. It allows you to nicely frame the flowing dress.

However, two other critiques:
1) In portraiture, the background is almost as important as the subject. Look past the subject, what do you see? That pole is killllllling me. Take a half-step to the left and turn slightly to the right, and the pole will be gone. The cars and the building are not so great either, but maybe you couldn't avoid them in this location.

If your lens will do it, a wider aperture (for less DOF) can help make the faraway background elements less distracting.

2. Stay out of direct sun if you can. It makes hard shadows that are hard to work with, and it makes the subject want to squint and wrinkle up their face. Her face is a bit underexposed here, especially where her hair and brow cast a shadow onto her eyes. You can use fill flash or reflector to help mitigate this, or get the subject into the shade.[/QUOTE]

Great advice, ill def use this next time im out and about in a cosplay photoshoot! thank you

#33 claudillama on 6 years ago

I guess what I was trying to do to this photo was give it a feel as if he was coming towards me.. Like he was moving.. BUt i think i put too much of a tilt [IMG][url=http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/8332181057/][img]http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8361/8332181057_de3098c90d_z.jpg[/img][/url]
[url=http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/8332181057/]FF61[/url] by [url=http://www.flickr.com/people/[email protected]/]Claudillama[/url], on Flickr[/IMG]

#34 claudillama on 6 years ago

This was my first photoshoot at a con, so reading this thread gave me a lot of great advice of what to do and what not to do!! I went a little overboard with the tilts in my first photoshoot, but i will make sure i wont make the same mistake again! Thank you all [IMG][url=http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/8333237708/][img]http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8360/8333237708_071b98e5e8_z.jpg[/img][/url]
[url=http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/8333237708/]FF63[/url] by [url=http://www.flickr.com/people/[email protected]/]Claudillama[/url], on Flickr[/IMG]

#35 brucer007 on 6 years ago

[U]@Claudillama[/U] My point was not to say, Dutch Tilting the camera a lot is always to a bad effect. It can be a great effect if used wisely with purpose.

A general rule of thumb could be: Don't make the flat ground look too slanted, unless it works for a certain effect.

Here, I am posting a photo with nearly the same amount of tilt as your last post. I avoided showng the ground, so the floor will not seem like the Cosplayer might lose her balance and fall.

[IMG]http://photo.cosplay.com/150562/2126237.jpg[/IMG]

#36 claudillama on 6 years ago

[QUOTE=brucer007;4579148][U]@Claudillama[/U] My point was not to say, Dutch Tilting the camera a lot is always to a bad effect. It can be a great effect if used wisely with purpose.


A general rule of thumb could be: Don't make the flat ground look too slanted, unless it works for a certain effect.

Here, I am posting a photo with nearly the same amount of tilt as your last post. I avoided showng the ground, and trees often do grow diagonally, so it looks buildings are usually straight up, unless they are pyramids, broken down structures from destruction, or the Leaning Tower in Italy.

[IMG]http://images.cosplay.com/photos/29/2905133.jpg[/IMG][/QUOTE]


I see what your saying! THank you again for the help :)

#37 skyywriting on 6 years ago

I don't use the effect much, but I wouldn't mind some critique on some of my tilted photos. =)
And some critique on their over all composition if you have any thoughts.


[URL="http://i994.photobucket.com/albums/af61/somethingnewJay/photo/zach3b.jpg"]1[/URL]
[URL="http://i994.photobucket.com/albums/af61/somethingnewJay/vinnyfix2_zps27dc66af.jpg"]2[/URL]

#38 brucer007 on 6 years ago

@ [U]Skyywriting[/U] This image seems to benefit from the Dutch Tilt, giving it pleasing awkward effect to go with the spooky character and location.is image seems to benefit from the Dutch Tilt, giving it pleasing awkward effect to go with the spooky character and location. His feet apart make it seem like he is off balance, trying to compensate for the tilt...I like this pose in a Dutch Tilt. Compositionally, showing the shoes would improve this photo.
[IMG]http://i994.photobucket.com/albums/af61/somethingnewJay/vinnyfix2_zps27dc66af.jpg[/IMG]

This photo is too dark to see well. His legs being together doesn't work well with the tilt...The tilt seems too forced and does not seem to add a good effect. I would like this photo better if it was straight.
[IMG]http://i994.photobucket.com/albums/af61/somethingnewJay/photo/zach3b.jpg[/IMG]

#39 FlashBlitzen on 6 years ago

[QUOTE=brucer007;4357067]Indeed, the term "Dutch Tilt" is an official name I learned in film school. It was commonly used on the tv show BATMAN with Adam West, to create a feeling of disruption or evil.

[/QUOTE]

Ah, the original Batman series. I liked how they would rotate the camera when climbing buildings. The Dutch angle or German angle was something I was familiar with from old classic Film Noir and such but not so much liked in "stills" It seems to work for me better in movies.

For some odd reason, in stills, if the main subject ( model ) creates a strong angle in a pose, that seems ok. One man's ceiling is another man's floor, I guess. (hmmm - idea for concept shoot. - writing this down)

Your work is wonderful. My website is still being set up. Cheers!
~ Robert

#40 brucer007 on 5 years ago

I used a Dutch Tilt here, since it is more common to see it in super hero comic books. I used it with a character like Bizarro Superman, since he is bazar, and it made Green Lantern seem more off-balance as he was attacked. It also made Bizarro seem more dominant in the situation. How does the tilt work for you all? Hit or miss?

[IMG]http://orig11.deviantart.net/1227/f/2017/162/f/4/greenlantern_vs_bizarro_7251tl700x431_by_brucer007-dbcboxg.jpg[/IMG]

#41 Foques on 5 years ago

one of the easy ways to tell that you're an experienced and tenured photog - all your images have something to gain from the tilt; it helps to tell the story.
Love 'em!

#42 brucer007 on 2 years ago

It's been over 3 years since anybody posted here about sharing and critiquing Dutch Tilt compositions in photos.

Here is another, but the background was edited in later. The building seems tilted, but Cosplayer Susan seems mostly straight up.

[IMG]http://orig06.deviantart.net/55d5/f/2015/274/1/3/suuzan_as_lissa_0270tl800x533_by_brucer007-d9bknjb.jpg[/IMG]

#43 brucer007 on 2 years ago

This image seems to be looking straight up a building, but the windows line up diagonally, making it a Dutch Tilt.

[IMG]http://photo.cosplay.com/150562/3592805.jpg[/IMG]

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