Ask a Photographer!

Archived Thread
Our site is currently being changed over to the new version. Everything you see is currently in read-only mode. Additionally, the layout and UI will not be complete until all sections have been re-enabled, so please ignore any layout issues (or bland-ness) at this time.
#46 tfcreate on 9 years ago

[QUOTE=ShiiNaKotoki;3351384]Thank you for opening such a thread, it's immensely helpful~~^^

Okay! I have a questions for fellow photographers!

How will you photographers react to suggestions & request that is not really your style of photographing?

TEXTALANCHE!
Thank you & have a nice day <3[/QUOTE]

A photographer is likely to interpret the theme of the shoot based on his/her own vision, so style becomes rather amorphous.

If a photographer is reduced to copying the style of another .... well IMHO, that doesn't make him/her an artist... just a technician.
TFC

#47 Kitsoru on 9 years ago

Here's one that's been getting me, now that I've been looking around at stuff in preperation for con season:

There's all sorts of makeup products out there, primers especially, that are designed to color-correct your skin for the camera. Do you photogs ever notice the difference in this regard? Do you guys feel that these kinds of products are "necessary" when some color corrections are basically standard in photoshop post-processing? Do you guys have any interest/knowledge of these sorts of products as far as how they effect the camera? For either a private, set-up shoot, or for con snapshots.

Just curious :)

#48 brucer007 on 9 years ago

Having the proper makeup will ensure that you will look your best in photos. You can't depend that photographers will touch up things you did not correct.

Makeup Primers are good to use under makeup to help it look good for a longer period of time. You will require less touch-ups.

Color-correcting skin can help you look better in photos and in person. If you have red, blotchy areas or pimples, some red neutralizer will even this out. Dark circles under the eyes can also be reduced by using the proper concealer.

For foundation, generally it is best to us one which matches the natural color of the your skin as close as possible. Then it will be less noticable. If the character you are cosplaying needs a different color foundation, then it will look more real if you carefully blend it into your scalp-line and taper it down your neck until it fades below the neck-line of your costume. Be aware that foundation can rub off onto your costume.

#49 Elemental on 9 years ago

[QUOTE=Kitsoru;3363128]...Do you guys feel that these kinds of products are "necessary" when some color corrections are basically standard in photoshop post-processing?
[/QUOTE]

Be careful on the assumption of standard, as all photogs have different styles and opinions when it comes to post processing. For a very long time I only made global changes to images in lightroom, which would not adjust for redness, blochyness, or the like. Skin requires it's own set of edits that aren't inherently part of the process, and proper makeup is always, always a better idea than hoping the photographer you don't know is decent at photoshop, whether it's for a snapshot or a full shoot.
(Your mileage per photog will vary, but that's why knowing their work helps).

As far as what they do, yes, I'm pretty familiar with with makeup products (since I've completely changed my skintone a few times now) but I don't think it's needed for a photog to know what your makeup does, especially primers, and colour corrections. Once you have it applied, it's just the canvas he's photographing. They're not really affecting the camera so much as they're affecting your skin, and proper application is the model's responsibility. [B]@brucer007[/B]'s tips are spot on; blending is really important or you end up with a line where your makeup ends.

#50 Harra Arial on 9 years ago

As a Cosplayer who has only worked with about two Photographers on seperate occasions:

Do you prefer when the model comes up with all the pose ideas, and the "theme" of the photos and directs your work for you, or do you prefer to suggest the poses, theme, and the like for the photos?

Also, who do you think should get the photos first, the model, or someone else? And who do you prefer to decide which photos are to keep and which are to toss? Yourself, or the model? Or is it a joint effort?

Thank you kindly~

#51 Elemental on 9 years ago

[QUOTE=Harra Arial;3363541]
Do you prefer when the model comes up with all the pose ideas, and the "theme" of the photos and directs your work for you, or do you prefer to suggest the poses, theme, and the like for the photos?
[/QUOTE]

It's usually a combined effort. It's always great to work with a model who has a stack of poses and ideas in mind for the shoot, be it mood or theme - at the same time, I do have a certain look to my photos myself, and I want to make sure what I take is something I can be proud of as well.
Most often though, my models don't have a lot in mind for a shoot, which means I do a lot of preplanning and research so that I can give ideas and suggestions for poses and the like.

[QUOTE=Harra Arial;3363541]
Also, who do you think should get the photos first, the model, or someone else? And who do you prefer to decide which photos are to keep and which are to toss? Yourself, or the model? Or is it a joint effort?
[/QUOTE]

If by get you mean post, that's the photographer's right for first uploads, unless otherwise agreed upon beforehand. The photos are the photographers, not the models, and distribution is always up to the photographer. Thankfully the cosplay community is wonderfully laid back about photo sharing.

As far as photo selection goes: even with paid shoots I choose what images get posted to my site - though in consideration to the models I usually post every image that 'turns out' because what I consider a flattering photo they may not like, and vice versa. This gives them the most choice without stripping away the work I've done because they 'don't like how they look'. I've worked with awesome people who, cosplayers or no, are not anywhere near comfortable with themselves or how they really look, and have watched great photos be nixed because they didn't like one part. That doesn't mean I won't remove a photo that someone is uncomfortable with, but I'm not fond of mass deletions simply because my model crossed their obi wrong or thinks they smile funny.;)

#52 winterwish on 9 years ago

I've been asked by friends to take shoots down and I've done that for them.

#53 Eurobeat King on 9 years ago

[QUOTE=winterwish;3364395]I've been asked by friends to take shoots down and I've done that for them.[/QUOTE]

me too, and not just a few pictures from the shoot, but the entire photoshoot mann.. :razz:

#54 Elemental on 9 years ago

[QUOTE=Eurobeat King;3364458]me too, and not just a few pictures from the shoot, but the entire photoshoot mann.. :razz:[/QUOTE]

Yeah. I always think that's a bit extreme. ^_^

#55 Eurobeat King on 9 years ago

[QUOTE=Elemental;3364466]Yeah. I always think that's a bit extreme. ^_^[/QUOTE]

Would you think the final-say would be up to the photographer or the cosplayer to remove an entire photoshoot?

If they're friends of mine, i usually like to respect their wishes, even if the photoshoot was nicely done, with a great location/background. But most of the time, if they want the entire shoot removed, I'll do it.

#56 Elemental on 9 years ago

[QUOTE=Eurobeat King;3364480]Would you think the final-say would be up to the photographer or the cosplayer to remove an entire photoshoot?

If they're friends of mine, i usually like to respect their wishes, even if the photoshoot was nicely done, with a great location/background. But most of the time, if they want the entire shoot removed, I'll do it.[/QUOTE]

You know, I'm not sure? The play-nice part of me would want to respect the request, the photographer (I hesitate to say artist) hates the idea of not being able to show off something I know is good.

It'd probably compramise, and only keep a few personal favourites in a portfolio, unless the request had something serious behind it (like the model needed to remove her online presence for safety, or because they'd gotten a contract with an agency with exclusive rights, or something similar.)

#57 striker0 on 9 years ago

Well, I do have a question. In my neck of the woods, I'm known as the box gundam guy, and through each convention, I do my best to mix it up a bit, so that each costume is unique, and not just a mishmosh of boxes. But lately, I've been finding myself with, simply put, a lack of poses. Any suggestions of how I can mix those up as well, so that people that may want to take my picture, won't get bored with the same stuff year after year?

#58 winterwish on 9 years ago

[QUOTE=maulrat;3364644]Furthest I've gotten was being asked to remove a single photo. It hurts but don't fret. I'm sure you'll take thousands more XD
[/QUOTE]

honestly I don't really care because I am an artist. Okay.. it does matter... but it doesn't matter matter LOL.

It's not the sum of my past works, but it's rather being able to having the ability to create in the future that matters to me.

BUT if you go after my favorite shots on the front page, the answer is.
NO. ;)

#59 brucer007 on 9 years ago

[QUOTE=striker0;3364643]Well, I do have a question...I do my best to mix it up a bit, so that each costume is unique, and not just a mishmosh of boxes. But lately, I've been finding myself with, simply put, a lack of poses. Any suggestions of how I can mix those up as well, so that people that may want to take my picture, won't get bored with the same stuff year after year?[/QUOTE]

One good way to know poses for photo shoots, is to do your homework and learn poses that are typical of your character. You should be able to find these poses from the movie or drawings your cosplay is from. There should be still images available on the internet, if you Google your character and click on Images, or go to websites related to that character.

You can also borrow poses from other sources or characters. Some poses may be generic enough to suit your needs. Gundam robots often stand in martial arts, or combat poses. Look at other cosplayer's photos. Try self defense books or magazines and/or websites. Put together a collection of images to keep with you to help you remember, and to make it easier for you to immitate them more accurately during photo shoots.

You don't have to re-invent the wheel. Use what has already worked well.

#60 TenshiUyoku on 9 years ago

Odd question, but if photographers (I'm a cosplayer, not a photographer) see a group of people who aren't from the same series do you just do single shots of each cosplayer or will you still do group shots even though it looks a little off? If this has already been asked in this thread, my apologies since I haven't had time to read through from page one.

Follow Cosplay.com