Yugioh ARC-V Moonlight Cat Dancer 'mask'

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#1 Black Blossom on 1 year ago

Just asking this for future reference, but how would I go about making this 'mask'? Well, she's not actually wearing a mask, this is just how she happens to look like in the anime, but for me I'd have go about making one in real life. She's supposed to be a humanized cat monster.
Materials that come to mind are worbla and paint, but what are other options that I can use?

Reference: [url]https://i.pinimg.com/originals/77/27/a3/7727a3d25166bdee46d58a7b8d275cde.jpg[/url]

#2 Penlowe on 1 year ago

If you're familiar with working with worbla, sure. I'm old fashioned and cheap so my go-to is paper mache.

#3 Black Blossom on 1 year ago

[QUOTE=Penlowe;5067167]If you're familiar with working with worbla, sure. I'm old fashioned and cheap so my go-to is paper mache.[/QUOTE]

It'd be my first time working with worbla, but I hear the raving about how good it is xD. Paper mache isn't a bad idea either but I know my local art store sells masks, and half face mask, would layering and applying the worba or paper mache over the base mask to make it be okay, too? I don't think there'd be a problem but anything construction-wise is worth noting since, well, it's my first time and just don't want it to fall apart.

#4 Penlowe on 1 year ago

Practice, practice, practice.

Any materials you consider, get a little bit and test out those techniques. Worbla is expensive, and it's not something you want to dive right in and mess up with all of what you have.

I'm all in favor of using ready made items, especially when they are going to be an underneath layer not seen. That said, try on those masks first. I know a lot of the plastic shell masks from the big chain craft stores don't fit adults well, they are sized for kid faces.

#5 walkerofdarknes on 1 year ago

If you're going to make orange and purple part of it, I'd probably either do it in a thin piece of Sintra or a combination of Sintra and EVA foam if you wanted to give it some visual depth. The combination piece would have a Sintra backing just to give it a touch more rigidity.

#6 Black Blossom on 1 year ago

[QUOTE=Penlowe;5067204]Practice, practice, practice.

Any materials you consider, get a little bit and test out those techniques. Worbla is expensive, and it's not something you want to dive right in and mess up with all of what you have.

I'm all in favor of using ready made items, especially when they are going to be an underneath layer not seen. That said, try on those masks first. I know a lot of the plastic shell masks from the big chain craft stores don't fit adults well, they are sized for kid faces.[/QUOTE]

I'm pretty petite, so I should be okay. In fact I bought one of them for Halloween a few years go. It felt well, but I couldn't breathe in it unfortunately. However, since this is a half face mask I'll using instead it'll be fine. Worbla is definitely expensive for sure, but looks like I'll be able to split the cost between this costume and another I'm thinking of doing, but I will take your suggestion into consideration. Definitely don't wanna spend a pretty penny just for it to get ruined. Alternatively, since this mask is made up of different parts, I can buy the $30 sample pack that Arda offers and try that. And if it goes well, since it'll be painted anyways, the odd colours won't make a difference.

[QUOTE=walkerofdarknes;5067207]If you're going to make orange and purple part of it, I'd probably either do it in a thin piece of Sintra or a combination of Sintra and EVA foam if you wanted to give it some visual depth. The combination piece would have a Sintra backing just to give it a touch more rigidity.[/QUOTE]

Ohh, I like that idea, well definitely keep in mind! From a quick Google search looks I'll be able to find it at Walmart, Amazon and Home Depot among other places. I also looked up Sintra and it's just a fancy way of saying 'foam board', lol. But I've seen foam boards with styrofoam and not a fan of it, however I've seen foam boards at the dollar store that are...'different' so I might try the cheaper option, as Penlowe has suggested to see what I can come up with.

Thanks you two!

Edit:
Forgot ask, for the paint, is acrylic paint okay to use? Specifically Liquitex acrylic paint? I also have this paint called DecoArt Crafter's Acrylic paint. Label says you can mix it with other stuff, too. Should be okay, right? If I have to buy something else, then okay, but I have this stuff lying around and figured I should use it.

#7 Scunosi on 1 year ago

[QUOTE=Black Blossom;5067180]It'd be my first time working with worbla, but I hear the raving about how good it is xD. Paper mache isn't a bad idea either but I know my local art store sells masks, and half face mask, would layering and applying the worba or paper mache over the base mask to make it be okay, too? I don't think there'd be a problem but anything construction-wise is worth noting since, well, it's my first time and just don't want it to fall apart.[/QUOTE]
If it already exists no reason not to start with one of those small masks as a base at least IMO. You could even just use one to make a pattern off of to make the same thing in a different material if you prefer.

Also I've heard Worbla really has to have a backing as it can't support itself, so you'll want something under it anyway if you do use it such as one of those masks.

#8 Black Blossom on 1 year ago

[QUOTE=Scunosi;5067217]If it already exists no reason not to start with one of those small masks as a base at least IMO. You could even just use one to make a pattern off of to make the same thing in a different material if you prefer.

Also I've heard Worbla really has to have a backing as it can't support itself, so you'll want something under it anyway if you do use it such as one of those masks.[/QUOTE]

I see. That's really new to me since it seems people who've used that material know what they're doing and just simply do it and out comes the thing they're making, lol. I'll keep that in mind as well. That wouldn't be a bad idea to use the mask as my pattern, so I can make the mask squarely by hand. I know there are tutorials for making masks as well so I'll look that up, too.
Thanks :>

#9 walkerofdarknes on 1 year ago

[quote]I also looked up Sintra and it's just a fancy way of saying 'foam board', lol. But I've seen foam boards with styrofoam and not a fan of it, however I've seen foam boards at the dollar store that are...'different' so I might try the cheaper option, as Penlowe has suggested to see what I can come up with. [/quote]

Sintra isn't quite the same as foam board, it's actually PVC that's laid out in flat sheets instead of rolled into tubes. At least I'm not sure if the standard foam board sold in office supply stores but I haven't checked. It might also be the same as the dollar store ones. I do know that most hardware stores will have it (Lowe's usually sells a 12"x12"x.5" that gets delivered to its store quickly, and it's listed as $12 for that). I got much bigger sheets at a good rate from a local bulk supplier. But the advantage of using Sintra is you can heat it and mold it, cut it pretty easily (the sheets I have are 3mm thick, I can score them a couple times with my utility knife and it snaps clean) and you can use the same PVC glue found in hardware stores for plumbing, and that glue will hold it....forever. The test glues I did snapped before the glue failed.

#10 Penlowe on 1 year ago

[QUOTE]Edit:
Forgot ask, for the paint, is acrylic paint okay to use? Specifically Liquitex acrylic paint? I also have this paint called DecoArt Crafter's Acrylic paint. Label says you can mix it with other stuff, too. Should be okay, right? If I have to buy something else, then okay, but I have this stuff lying around and figured I should use it.[/QUOTE]

Not having painted Worbla or Sintra, I can't answer that part (although I believe both are designed to be painted).

Both the Liquitex and the DecoArt are acrylic paints. The difference in cost & viscosity is that the Liquitex is intended for serious artists and has purer pigments in higher concentrations with the idea that artists will mix their own colors and thin with water to their desired viscosity. The DecoArt is both watered down and blended to achieve specific (trendy) colors without the user needing to spend time thinning or mixing. As such the craft acrylics, while still mixable, don't always give the same results as pure pigment paints. Yes, you can mix them together.

Liquitex, is a 'mid-grade' artist paint, there are cheaper (Artist's Loft, Soho) and more expensive (Windsor & Newton, Golden). I find it's really one of the best choices for this kind of application because it is significantly better than the craft grade acrylics.

Happy painting!

#11 Black Blossom on 1 year ago

[QUOTE=walkerofdarknes;5067225]Sintra isn't quite the same as foam board, it's actually PVC that's laid out in flat sheets instead of rolled into tubes. At least I'm not sure if the standard foam board sold in office supply stores but I haven't checked. It might also be the same as the dollar store ones. I do know that most hardware stores will have it (Lowe's usually sells a 12"x12"x.5" that gets delivered to its store quickly, and it's listed as $12 for that). I got much bigger sheets at a good rate from a local bulk supplier. But the advantage of using Sintra is you can heat it and mold it, cut it pretty easily (the sheets I have are 3mm thick, I can score them a couple times with my utility knife and it snaps clean) and you can use the same PVC glue found in hardware stores for plumbing, and that glue will hold it....forever. The test glues I did snapped before the glue failed.[/QUOTE]

Ohh, okay. I see. Lowe's tends to be expensive, however, I do have Home Depot and Staples. But if I find a large sheet/tube that's enough for me to use in case of a slip up, or for future projects I'm good with that too. It also depends on stock and what store I go to. I've got those tools on hand, so yet another expense I don't have to worry about (yay!) xD.

[QUOTE=Penlowe;5067231]Not having painted Worbla or Sintra, I can't answer that part (although I believe both are designed to be painted).

Both the Liquitex and the DecoArt are acrylic paints. The difference in cost & viscosity is that the Liquitex is intended for serious artists and has purer pigments in higher concentrations with the idea that artists will mix their own colors and thin with water to their desired viscosity. The DecoArt is both watered down and blended to achieve specific (trendy) colors without the user needing to spend time thinning or mixing. As such the craft acrylics, while still mixable, don't always give the same results as pure pigment paints. Yes, you can mix them together.

Liquitex, is a 'mid-grade' artist paint, there are cheaper (Artist's Loft, Soho) and more expensive (Windsor & Newton, Golden). I find it's really one of the best choices for this kind of application because it is significantly better than the craft grade acrylics.

Happy painting![/QUOTE]

Yep, I know. I'm more familiar with the Liquitex brand as I've painted being an art student so I know the properties. I've been taught to go with a pro brand instead of cheaper ones not because of a pretty label, but because you'll end up getting your money's worth. I find Windsor is much more potent than Liquitex; but that could be because I've only used that brand for watercolours. Lasted me quite a while. What I can do is try on a scrap piece of material I choose to go with and see what happens, with both paints.

Thanks a lot everyone!

#12 walkerofdarknes on 1 year ago

[quote]Ohh, okay. I see. Lowe's tends to be expensive, however, I do have Home Depot and Staples. But if I find a large sheet/tube that's enough for me to use in case of a slip up, or for future projects I'm good with that too. It also depends on stock and what store I go to. I've got those tools on hand, so yet another expense I don't have to worry about (yay!) xD.[/quote]

I go to Laird's Plastics. If you're in the LA area (judging by your con choices), you can check them out. Just call them up, tell them you want to do a Will Call order (funny, I know) and see if they have any in stock. When I did my order, it was a minimum requirement of $100, but I got 4 sheets of 3mm Sintra at 8 feet x 10 feet for $25 each. So yeah, I've got plenty of spares. There's also some thicker versions too (which are more expensive), but are also heavier and better for some structural uses (I'm going to redo my Gundam in Sintra, and I know...Punished Props tends to use 1-2 inch thick stuff for some of their weapons).

#13 nathancarter on 1 year ago

I'll try to keep my soapbox-spiel brief.

Sintra is a brand name of PVC foam sheet; other brand names include Komatex and Palight ProjectPVC. It's rigid and sturdy. It comes in a variety of thicknesses, with 1/4" (6mm) and 1/8" (3mm) being the most common. It can be cut with a hobby knife or jigsaw; I usually use a snap-blade utility knife and a cutting mat. It can be easily (and repeatedly) thermoformed with a heat gun. It can be drilled, sanded, and dremeled like wood, and glued with high-temp hot glue or cyanoacrylate super glue. It needs little to no surface prep before paint, though I like to use a sandable filler primer as a base coat, especially if I want to sand it with a fine-grit paper to prep for a glossy surface. You can paint it with just about anything; I've used a variety of rattle-can paints and acrylics. And, it's way way cheaper than worbla.

Downsides: It doesn't stretch much, so it's hard to do compound curves such as boob cups and shoulder pauldrons. These can be done but they need darts (like fabric) and a little finesse and planning. And, the 6mm-and-thicker material CAN be cut with a razor knife, but a jigsaw makes things a lot easier.

My current build is almost entirely Sintra, though I've used vacu-formed styrene for some of the domed pieces that would have been hard to hand-fabricate out of sheet material:
[url]https://www.facebook.com/astonmartiniandvictorvoyeurcosplay/posts/651402665205468[/url]

#14 Black Blossom on 1 year ago

[QUOTE=walkerofdarknes;5067293]I go to Laird's Plastics. If you're in the LA area (judging by your con choices), you can check them out. Just call them up, tell them you want to do a Will Call order (funny, I know) and see if they have any in stock. When I did my order, it was a minimum requirement of $100, but I got 4 sheets of 3mm Sintra at 8 feet x 10 feet for $25 each. So yeah, I've got plenty of spares. There's also some thicker versions too (which are more expensive), but are also heavier and better for some structural uses (I'm going to redo my Gundam in Sintra, and I know...Punished Props tends to use 1-2 inch thick stuff for some of their weapons).[/QUOTE]

Haha, no I'm way up North xD. But it was nice of you to offer though :). Though I'm sure I can find it in Eastern Ontario, at my local hardware stores and places like Walmart, too. I need a fairly thin board for the mask, seeing as anything thick will make it too heavy to wear (even with the string I'll probably need for it stay on my face) and probably won't hold the shape of my face or mask (if I'm using a pre-made one as my base).

[QUOTE=nathancarter;5067305]I'll try to keep my soapbox-spiel brief.

Sintra is a brand name of PVC foam sheet; other brand names include Komatex and Palight ProjectPVC. It's rigid and sturdy. It comes in a variety of thicknesses, with 1/4" (6mm) and 1/8" (3mm) being the most common. It can be cut with a hobby knife or jigsaw; I usually use a snap-blade utility knife and a cutting mat. It can be easily (and repeatedly) thermoformed with a heat gun. It can be drilled, sanded, and dremeled like wood, and glued with high-temp hot glue or cyanoacrylate super glue. It needs little to no surface prep before paint, though I like to use a sandable filler primer as a base coat, especially if I want to sand it with a fine-grit paper to prep for a glossy surface. You can paint it with just about anything; I've used a variety of rattle-can paints and acrylics. And, it's way way cheaper than worbla.

Downsides: It doesn't stretch much, so it's hard to do compound curves such as boob cups and shoulder pauldrons. These can be done but they need darts (like fabric) and a little finesse and planning. And, the 6mm-and-thicker material CAN be cut with a razor knife, but a jigsaw makes things a lot easier.

My current build is almost entirely Sintra, though I've used vacu-formed styrene for some of the domed pieces that would have been hard to hand-fabricate out of sheet material:
[url]https://www.facebook.com/astonmartiniandvictorvoyeurcosplay/posts/651402665205468[/url][/QUOTE]

That looks really neat! Nice construction :). Hmm, I see since it won't stretch (though usually these kinds of materials don't? Or is that just me?) I'll have to cut it slightly larger than it needs to be so I can trim it down if it's ends being too big. But I'm using common sense though. Already have my cutting materials, so I'm all set there. I'll probably go this route (someday I'll use worbla!) since it's cheaper and won't hurt my wallet if things go wrong.

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