Where to find nonstretch snakeskin print fabric?

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#1 TMLiza on 11 months ago

Hi everyone, been a while since I posted on here. I've been on the hunt for white snakeskin print fabric for months now but I haven't been able to find anything that would work for my project. The problem is, I need it in non stretch and not made from vinyl/something heavy duty. I also want it to have a slight sheen but I think that's making it even harder on myself. =_= I dug around various online stores, I'm trying not to go spoonflower since it is expensive and I need a lot of it. So I'm hoping someone on here has another possible source. ^_^

Ref of the outfit in question: [url]http://aonoexorcist.wikia.com/wiki/File:Volume_17_Cover.jpg[/url]

#2 lunaflora on 11 months ago

I think your best bet might be to either do spoonflower, or get white fabric and paint on the design yourself with something like Jacquard's Lumiere metallic silver paint. I haven't found anything that would suit your needs after searching for a while, either.
I did find an upholstery weight one though. Way too heavy for a kimono, but figured I would show you because who knows? I have no idea how credible this site is, but it's a velvet. [URL="https://www.fabric-textiles.com/263113-725-Crocodile-White-Velvet"]https://www.fabric-textiles.com/263113-725-Crocodile-White-Velvet[/URL]

#3 Scunosi on 11 months ago

I'll admit I'm actually pretty ignorant about fabrics, but if it's already stretch and you don't need the stretch, rather than the other way around, couldn't you just attach the stretch fabric to a non-stretch backing fabric/lining and use it that way? If the existing stretch fabric is perfect I mean, if not then maybe making your own would work better.

#4 lunaflora on 11 months ago

[QUOTE=Scunosi;5065133]I'll admit I'm actually pretty ignorant about fabrics, but if it's already stretch and you don't need the stretch, rather than the other way around, couldn't you just attach the stretch fabric to a non-stretch backing fabric/lining and use it that way? If the existing stretch fabric is perfect I mean, if not then maybe making your own would work better.[/QUOTE]

That works with smaller, short pieces, but not for long lengths like this kimono. Gravity will take hold and the fabric will stretch longer and thinner than the shell fabric and things will look very very saggy and weird. Of course you could maybe make it a bit wider and shorter to account for that, but that's a lot of trouble to go through. Though it might be possible to just fuse a woven interfacing to the knit to stablize it. Maybe it's worth a shot. I have yet to find the fabric that is not heavyweight, pleather/vinyl, or upholstery fabric though.

It's not what you specified, but maybe this fabric can be a good alternative to use? It has sheen and a sort of sandy texture and a pattern I don't really know how to describe. [url]http://www.joann.com/sew-classic-silky-solid-cloud-9-jacquards-many-colors/xprd810621.html[/url]

#5 CapsuleCorp on 11 months ago

Noooooo don't use the silky solids from Joann's. They're very lightweight and flimsy. They make decent small pieces (scarves, trims) but they're a pain in the ass to sew. They move all over the place like a chiffon and make you cry.

TMLiza, the reason you're not finding anything is that it doesn't exist. I'm really not surprised at all, I've only ever seen snakeskin in three forms: Lycra, vinyl, or a silky print, and of those, the third is extremely rare because snake prints are not as ubiquitously popular all year every year like leopard, tiger, and zebra.

It's the lining of the kimono, and those scales are huge, so I would honestly make it yourself. Paint or dye is the best way, but don't think of hand-painting or even stenciling, think block printing. Or, if you want to paint the darker area between scales and not actually paint the scales, a stencil or even paint markers with a ruler might be just fine. It'll be some work, but it'll look amazing in the end. That way you can choose whatever fabric you want - a cotton or sateen, or something silkier but not too slippery to sew like the Sew Classic crap, as long as it's woven and takes paint without bleeding.

Thinking through the options, especially with scales that large and visible from a distance, I think paint would be faster and less of a headache than individually appliqueing scales out of another fabric. That is an option, but even just using Heat n Bond to glue them on, not finishing the edges, is going to backfire. The inside lining of a kimono will rub against your other clothes so anything unfinished is going to fray like mad. The scales would have to either be something that doesn't fray (like, ugh, a vinyl) or you'd have to finish them all off, in which case paint becomes the faster and cleaner option.

#6 Penlowe on 11 months ago

I'm with CC, I'd make a stencil and paint it.

To avoid painting too much fabric or fighting the seams, cut out the pieces, paint them, then sew together.

#7 TMLiza on 11 months ago

Thanks for the input guys. I'm terrified of painting designs on fabric(I'm more of a embroider everything sort of person xD) but it looks like painting will be the way to go on this.

#8 Penlowe on 11 months ago

As with anything: practice, practice, practice.

It's such a large area it'll be worth your while to make a stencil in plastic. Then that stencil can be used indefinitely (as opposed to a poster board one that will get soggy)and you can get in a lot of practice on paper and trash fabric before going to your garment fabric.

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