Adding pinstripes to pair of jeans

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#1 smaaaaash on 8 months ago

I'm throwing together a quick cosplay that doesn't have many components. Here I am with the following dilemma: I'm starting with a finished pair of jeans I picked up for cheap, but the jeans need red pinstripes.

I don't think hand-painting this would be very fun or easy, so I'm thinking I should mark the garment and sew a single stitch where I need the pinstripes. My only concern is that denim can be pretty thick to sew through. Is this the best way to approach this task, or are there better ways of adding pinstripes to a finished pair of jeans? What would be the best way to keep the lines straight and even?

#2 lunaflora on 8 months ago

While I do think this would be the cleanest way to achieve a line, you'd probably not be able to fit the jeans into the sewing machine. Especially the leg area. I would say your best bet is to just use a permanent fabric pen to draw the lines, but red would really only show up on white or other very light colors. Washing it afterwards may not be an option either depending on the pen. If you have a grid ruler, i highly recommend you use it.

You could also rip the side seams of the jeans to be able to feed it through your sewing machine in order to stitch lines

#3 smaaaaash on 8 months ago

[QUOTE=lunaflora;5066113]While I do think this would be the cleanest way to achieve a line, you'd probably not be able to fit the jeans into the sewing machine. Especially the leg area. I would say your best bet is to just use a permanent fabric pen to draw the lines, but red would really only show up on white or other very light colors. Washing it afterwards may not be an option either depending on the pen. If you have a grid ruler, i highly recommend you use it.

You could also rip the side seams of the jeans to be able to feed it through your sewing machine in order to stitch lines[/QUOTE]

Haha, wow. I didn't even think about actually fitting it into my machine, but I would have learned soon enough. Thanks for that reminder.

The color of the jeans is too dark for a pen. Depending on the construction of the jeans, I might be able to take it apart at the seams and stitch the lines in. I'll look into that. Thanks for your reply.

#4 Penlowe on 8 months ago

Ok if you want to sew perfectly straight lines on an existing pant, you need a long straight edged tool (yard stick, carpenters ruler) and a fabric pencil or chalk BEFORE painting or sewing, either by hand or machine.

Draw the lines before opening any portion of the garment. Side seams are often not perfectly straight, depending on the cut they might even be wiggly in more than one direction. So you need to measure flat and find the center at the top, middle, and bottom of each leg to run your first line straight up and down on the pants. Then you can use a ruler and scribe off of it to get the rest of your lines. It's a TON more work than you are expecting I bet.

#5 Dictamnus Albus on 8 months ago

unless your gona get dirty, washing jeans isnt really nesescary

id wait for second opinion penlowe and others more fabric inclined,

but i believe you could lay the jeans nice and flat, iron if needed,
then use masking tape to layout your line/pinstripes
and use a white paint marker to lay down a base, then colour that, over with red

place a strip of freezer/meat paper inside the leg to prevent bleed through
(after ironing, freezer paper is waxed and might not handle heat well)

#6 smaaaaash on 8 months ago

[QUOTE=Penlowe;5066119]Ok if you want to sew perfectly straight lines on an existing pant, you need a long straight edged tool (yard stick, carpenters ruler) and a fabric pencil or chalk BEFORE painting or sewing, either by hand or machine.

Draw the lines before opening any portion of the garment. Side seams are often not perfectly straight, depending on the cut they might even be wiggly in more than one direction. So you need to measure flat and find the center at the top, middle, and bottom of each leg to run your first line straight up and down on the pants. Then you can use a ruler and scribe off of it to get the rest of your lines. It's a TON more work than you are expecting I bet.[/QUOTE]

That makes sense, drawing the guides before opening the seam. I'll remember that. I just got the jeans and they seem easy to open at the seams, so I'll probably do this. I'm okay with the tedious work; the rest of the outfit's easy enough, and I don't mind putting a lot of work into the pants to get a clean product.

[QUOTE=Dictamnus Albus;5066126]unless your gona get dirty, washing jeans isnt really nesescary

id wait for second opinion penlowe and others more fabric inclined,

but i believe you could lay the jeans nice and flat, iron if needed,
then use masking tape to layout your line/pinstripes
and use a white paint marker to lay down a base, then colour that, over with red

place a strip of freezer/meat paper inside the leg to prevent bleed through
(after ironing, freezer paper is waxed and might not handle heat well)[/QUOTE]

This is a pretty good idea too! The way that the jeans are cut would make taping off straight lines according to the cut of the fabric very awkward, though. (I've tried masking lines onto pants and it's frustrating to keep the width of the lines even while also spacing them evenly. I ended up marking the measurements, then freehanding it.) Since these are premade jeans, they have a bit of a variation from the hip down to the ankle in the cut, meaning that the lines are going to end up having to bow and bend in order to remain evenly spaced. If I went with this method, I'd be much more inclined to measure out the marks where I need the stripes, draw them out, and then paint them freehand very, very carefully. They're only a few millimeters in width, and there are quite a few of them.

Both, I think, are valid ways to tackle this task. I appreciate the input.

#7 Penlowe on 8 months ago

[QUOTE]bit of a variation from the hip down to the ankle in the cut, meaning that the lines are going to end up having to bow and bend in order to remain evenly spaced.[/QUOTE]
no, they will all be parallel and some will end when they reach the fabric edge. If they curve they will have a completely different look from standard pinstripes. As exampled by this image of a sleeve cuff on a suit: [url]https://www.123rf.com/photo_22890629_black-and-white-pinstripe-suit-detail-up-close.html[/url]

#8 smaaaaash on 7 months ago

I see what you're saying based on the pic. Turns out I'm overcomplicating it in my head. The ref I have of the character has the lines bowing and bending in order to not run off at the seams, but I'm sure there has more to do with the fact that it's an artistic rendition of pinstripes more than anything.

#9 lunaflora on 7 months ago

[QUOTE=smaaaaash;5066146]I see what you're saying based on the pic. Turns out I'm overcomplicating it in my head. The ref I have of the character has the lines bowing and bending in order to not run off at the seams, but I'm sure there has more to do with the fact that it's an artistic rendition of pinstripes more than anything.[/QUOTE]
If that's the case, then you're free to do whatever one you choose. Doing the lines all parallel to each other like real pinstripes will probably be easier, while doing curves would be more complicated but more accurate.

#10 smaaaaash on 7 months ago

I'm much more partial to the idea of keeping them even and letting them run off, haha. It does sound less complicated. We will see.

#11 Penlowe on 7 months ago

Ah, ok. You can get masking tape in really skinny widths, like 1/2", 1/4" and even 1/8". At that size it curves nicely. Of course, those tiny rolls cost double what a standard roll of masking tape costs :/